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This course will cover how to use Social Media tools for Public Engagement. The course will be delivered by the Social Media and AV team.

This course will cover how to use Social Media tools for Public Engagement. The course will be delivered by the Social Media and AV team.

The Engaged Researcher: Media training Tue 21 Jan 2020   10:00 [Places]

This course gives an introduction into how to engage with the public through media. It will cover the differing types of media, what makes research newsworthy, how to work with the communications office to gain media coverage, what to expect from an interview (print, pre-recorded, live) and how to communicate well in interviews. It will be delivered jointly with the University Communications team

The Engaged Researcher: Media training new Fri 7 Jun 2019   10:00 Finished

This course gives an introduction into how to engage with the public through media. It will cover the differing types of media, what makes research newsworthy, how to work with the communications office to gain media coverage, what to expect from an interview (print, pre-recorded, live) and how to communicate well in interviews

What is in Impact? This course is going to disentangle academic and non-academic impact. It will explore the current research environment and impact agenda and help you understand how research is funded. You will get to discuss your research in small groups, and think about the types of impact it could generate. You will also understand where Public Engagement sits in the wider Impact agenda. You will have the opportunity to analyse impact cases studies that featured Public Engagement as a pathway to Impact. (Lunch will be provided)

The Engaged Researcher: Public Engagement Seminar new Tue 5 Feb 2019   12:30 Finished

Come to this Public Engagement Seminar to hear about an inspirational patient and public involvement (PPI) project from one of your colleagues in the University, Dr Anna Spathis. The PPI project won a prize at the 2018 Vice-Chancellor's public engagement with research awards.

This is also an opportunity to network with others interested in Public Engagement and to talk to a member of the Public Engagement Team.

Why not bring your lunch with you?

This 2 hour workshop will discuss "why does research matter and how do we share it?"

This workshop provides top tips and guidance on developing an impact evaluation survey that is robust. This will include helping participants identify and avoid common pitfalls in impact evaluation questionnaire design, as well as accounting for key issues such as representative sampling. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop their own survey questions with feedback and support during the workshop.

The Engaged Researcher: Research Video: Social Media new Tue 26 Feb 2019   09:30 Finished

Everyone is watching video on Social Media these days. So it is a great place to share your research. Learn about the best ways to create & upload video for, as well as go live on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram. You just need yourself, a smartphone and your enthusiasm!

The Engaged Researcher: Shooting Your Research Video new Tue 13 Nov 2018   09:30 Finished

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A video is a great way to spread the message of your research to different public audiences across the World! Attendees will be equipped with the skills needed to plan and shoot high quality footage for your very own research-video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video session.

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A video is a great way to spread the message of your research to different public audiences across the World! Attendees will be equipped with the skills needed to plan and shoot high quality footage for your very own research-video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video session.

(Lunch will be provided)

The Engaged Researcher: Telling Your Research Story new Wed 6 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

Whether at a conference, a science festival or in the pub, all scientists need to be able to talk about their work in an engaging and understandable way. This practical, hands-on session will help scientists develop their communication skills, so they are confident talking to diverse audiences in a range of environments.

The Engaged Researcher: Telling Your Research Story new Tue 30 Apr 2019   09:30 Finished

Whether at a conference, a science festival or in the pub, all scientists need to be able to talk about their work in an engaging and understandable way. This practical, hands-on session will help scientists develop their communication skills, so they are confident talking to diverse audiences in a range of environments.

Stories weave together fact and emotion, helping people to understand the world. They can also be a powerful tool for you to share your research with the public.

This whole day workshop run by the internationally acclaimed Story Collider, will help you to understand how narrative can enrich your science engagement. Through a combination of creative techniques and empirical science, you will brainstorm, develop and refine your own research stories.

The Engaged Researcher: Working with Museums new Wed 27 Nov 2019   10:00 [Places]

Museums and collections are so much more than the objects they house. They are places of research, education and engagement, and they are open to members of the public in ways that departments and colleges are not. They can allow researchers to reach a range of diverse audiences. This training session will give you an insight into the breadth of activity ongoing at University of Cambridge Museums and how it could relate to your research and public engagement plans. After this training you will have a better understanding of the opportunities to work with museums.

The Engaged Researcher: Working with Schools new Mon 10 Feb 2020   10:00 [Places]

This short course will provide you with information about the UK school system, the reality of working with a school. It will cover ways in which the University already works with schools and how you can get involved. The course will help you decide whether working with schools is the right PE activity to achieve your intended outcomes. Finally, it will also provide you with a range of ideas of how to engage with schools and how to plan an activity. This course will be delivered with the Widening Participation team

« Description not available »

You’ve heard of it but what’s all the fuss about?

Since it was announced in September 2018 there has been a great deal of coverage around Plan S – the new initiative for Open Access publishing. The plan calls for all scientific publications resulting from grants funded by public research to be made available on compliant journals or platforms. This decision has drawn both praise and alarm from the research community but what does it all mean?

This webinar will discuss the history of Plan S, the principles that make up the plan and the arguments both in favour and against.

Letters have been for centuries the main form of communication between scientists. Correspondence collections are a unique window into the social networks of prominent historical figures. What can digital social sciences and humanities reveal about the correspondence networks of 19th century scientists? This two-session intensive workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore possible answers to this question.

With the digitisation and encoding of personal letters, researchers have at their disposal a wealth of relational data, which we propose to study through social network analysis (SNA). The workshop will be divided in two sessions during which participants will “learn by doing” how to apply SNA to personal correspondence datasets. Following a guided project framework, participants will work on the correspondence collections of John Herschel and Charles Darwin. After a contextual introduction to the datasets, the sessions will focus on the basic concepts of SNA, data transformation and preparation, data visualisation and data analysis, with particular emphasis on “ego network” measures.

The two demonstration datasets used during the workshop will be provided by the Epsilon project, a research consortium between Cambridge Digital Library, The Royal Institution and The Royal Society of London aimed at building a collaborative digital framework for 19th century letters of science. The first dataset, the “Calendar of the Correspondence of Sir John Hershel Database at the Adler Planetarium”, is a collection of the personal correspondence of John Frederick William Herschel (1792-1871), a polymath celebrated for his contributions to the field of astronomy. Its curation process started in the 50s at the Royal Society and currently comprises 14.815 digitised letters encoded in extensible markup language (.xml) format. The second dataset, the “Darwin Correspondence Project” has been locating, researching, editing and publishing Charles Darwin’s letters since 1974. In addition to a 30-volume print edition, the project has also made letters available in .xml format.

The workshop will provide a step-by-step guide to analysing correspondence networks from these collections, which will cover:

- Explanation of the encoding procedures and rationale following the Text Encoding Initiative guidelines; - Preparation and transformation of .xml files for analysis with an open source data wrangler; - Rendering of network visualisations using an open source SNA tool; - Analysis of the Ego Networks of John Herschel and Charles Darwin (requires UCINET)

About the speakers and course facilitators:

Anne Alexander is Director of Learning at Cambridge Digital Humanities

Hugo Leal is Methods Fellow at Cambridge Digital Humanities and Co-ordinator of the Cambridge Data School

Louisiane Ferlier is Digital Resources Manager at the Centre for the History of Science at the Royal Society. In her current role she facilitates research collaborations with the Royal Society collections, curates digital and physical exhibitions, as well as augmenting its portfolio of digital assets. A historian of ideas by training, her research investigates the material and intellectual circulation of ideas in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Elizabeth Smith is the Associate Editor for Digital Development at the Darwin Correspondence Project, where she contributed to the conversion of the Project’s work into TEI several years ago, and has since been collaborating with the technical director in enhancing the Darwin Project’s data. She is one of the co-ordinators of Epsilon, a TEI-based portal for nineteenth-century science letters.

No knowledge of prior knowledge of programming is required, instructions on software to install will be sent out before the workshop. Some exercises and preparation for the second session will be set during the first and participants should allow 2-3 hours for this. Please note, priority will be given to staff and students at the University of Cambridge for booking onto this workshop.

CDH Learning gratefully acknowledges the support of the Isaac Newton Trust and the Faculty of History for this workshop.

The Library as Data new Mon 15 Oct 2018   13:30 Finished

Discover the rich digital collections of Cambridge University Library and explore the methods and tools that researchers are using to analyse and visualise data.

The Library as Data: An overview new Wed 16 Oct 2019   11:00 Finished

Is the "digital library" more than a virtual rendering of the bookshelf or filing cabinet? Does the transformation of books into bytes and manuscripts into pixels change the way we create and share knowledge? This session introduces a conceptual toolkit for understanding the library collection in the digital age, and provides a guide to key methods for accessing, transforming and analysing the contents as data. Using the rich collections of Cambridge University Library as a starting point, we will explore:

  • Relations between digital and material texts and artefacts
  • Definitions of data and metadata
  • Methods for accessing data in bulk from digital collections
  • Understanding file formats and standards

The session will also provide an overview of the content in the rest of the term’s Library as Data programme, and introduce our annual call for applications to the Machine Reading the Archive Projects mentoring scheme.

The Library as Data: Digital Text Markup and TEI new Wed 23 Oct 2019   11:00 Finished

Text encoding, or the addition of semantic meaning to text, is a core activity in digital humanities, covering everything from linguistic analysis of novels to quantitative research on manuscript collections. In this session we will take a look at the fundamentals of text encoding – why we might want to do it, and why we need to think carefully about our approaches. We will also introduce the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), the most commonly used standard for markup in the digital humanities, and look at some common research applications through examples.

Recent advances in machine learning are allowing computer vision and humanities researchers to develop new tools and methods for exploring digital image collections. Neural network models are now able to match, differentiate and classify images at scale in ways which would have been impossible a few years ago. This session introduces the IIIF image data framework, which has been developed by a consortium of the world’s leading research libraries and image repositories, and demonstrates a range of different machine learning- based methods for exploring digital image collections. We will also discuss some of the ethical challenges of applying computer vision algorithms to cultural and historical image collections. Topics covered will include:

  • Unlocking image collections with the IIIF image data framework
  • Machine Learning: a very short introduction
  • Working with images at scale: ethical and methodological challenges
  • Applying computer vision methods to digital collections

This session focusses on providing photography skills for those undertaking archival research. Dr Oliver Dunn has experience spanning a decade filming documents for major academic research projects. He will go over practical approaches to finding and ordering materials in the archive, methods of handling and filming them, digital file storage, and transcription strategies. The focus is very much on low-tech approaches and small budgets. We’ll consider best uses of smartphones, digital cameras and tripods. The session is held in the IT training room at the University Library.

Correspondence collections are a unique window into the social networks of prominent historical figures. With the digitisation and encoding of personal letters, researchers have at their disposal a wealth of relational data, which can be studied using social network analysis.

This session will introduce and demonstrate foundational concepts, methods and tools in social network analysis using datasets prepared from the Darwin Correspondence collection. Topics covered will include

  • Explanation of the encoding procedures and rationale following the Text Encoding Initiative guidelines
  • Preparation and transformation of .xml files for analysis with an open source data wrangler
  • Rendering of network visualisations using an open source SNA tool

No knowledge of prior knowledge of programming is required, instructions on software to install will be sent out before the session

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