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University Information Services course timetable

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Sat 25 Feb – Tue 7 Mar

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Monday 27 February

09:30
Web Authoring: HTML - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for Beginners (Level 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML. The course will introduce Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and show how they can (and should) be used effectively when creating web pages. The course teaches how to write CSS from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of three pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (1 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Falcon: Further Functionality for Site Managers (Part 3) new CANCELLED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course will cover the use of Falcon Content Management Service for site managers and is a follow on course from Falcon: An Introduction for Content and Site Managers (Part 1 and Part 2).

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

IT Community: Seminar [Places] 14:00 - 15:00 Old Schools, Syndicate Room

An IT Community seminar to provide members of the Collegiate University's IT Community with the opportunity to hear more about UIS projects looking at Storage, Cyber Security and the Heat implementation; contribute to the development of the Cambridge Behavioral Attributes for IT Professionals; and provide details about the launch of the mentoring scheme for 2017.

Tuesday 28 February

09:30
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (2 of 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Excel 2016: Analysing and Summarising Data [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This hands-on course is a follow up from the Excel: Introduction course.

Save Time and Increase Your Productivity with Dragon NaturallySpeaking [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

Countless busy professionals are now turning to speech recognition to speed up creating documents and streamlining their workflow.

This course will focus on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking for education to improve accuracy and will show you how to customise the software for your writing style.

The aim of this course is to teach you how to achieve 99% accuracy with Dragon NaturallySpeaking so that you spend less time correcting mis-recognitions and more time dictating text at speeds of up to 140 words per minute!

With Dragon you are only limited to the speed you can think - come and learn how get Dragon working for you!

See success stories of how Dragon is being used by education.

12:00
IT Community: Seminar [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Clinical School, Addenbrookes, Bay 13, Room A

An IT Community seminar to provide members of the Collegiate University's IT Community with the opportunity to hear more about UIS projects looking at Storage, Cyber Security and the Heat implementation; contribute to the development of the Cambridge Behavioral Attributes for IT Professionals; and provide details about the launch of the mentoring scheme for 2017.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (2 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Adobe Illustrator CC: Introduction [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site
  • Adobe Illustrator CC is a the industry leading professional illustration and drawing program for the creation of vector based graphics and artwork

Wednesday 1 March

09:00
Cisco CCNA for IT Supporters: Module 3 - Scaling Networks (Series 9) (4 of 12) Not bookable 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This is the third module of the CCNA series, should you wish to book on the series please book on Module 1 Introduction to Networks.

This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a large and complex network. You will learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, you will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. You will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network.

09:30
PHP: Introduction to Programming the Hypertext Preprocessor (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

12:00
IT Community: Seminar [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Clinical School, Addenbrookes, Bay 13, Room D

An IT Community seminar to provide members of the Collegiate University's IT Community with the opportunity to hear more about UIS projects looking at Storage, Cyber Security and the Heat implementation; contribute to the development of the Cambridge Behavioral Attributes for IT Professionals; and provide details about the launch of the mentoring scheme for 2017.

14:00
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (3 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Dragon Professional for Students [Places] 14:00 - 16:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Countless busy students are now turning to speech recognition to speed up creating documents and streamlining their workflow.

This course will focus on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking for education to improve accuracy and will show you how to customise the software for your writing style.

The aim of this course is to teach you how to achieve 99% accuracy with Dragon NaturallySpeaking so that you spend less time correcting mis-recognitions and more time dictating text at speeds of up to 140 words per minute!

With Dragon you are only limited to the speed you can think - come and learn how get Dragon working for you!

See success stories of how Dragon is being used by education.

Thursday 2 March

09:30
PHP: Introduction to Programming the Hypertext Preprocessor (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This PHP introduction course explores the basic elements of PHP script programming. PHP allows web developers to write dynamic web pages, for instance by simplifying ways to collect data through a web form, and to process and include data, by placing small scripts directly into HTML files.

Session 1 will provide background, tools and exercises for writing and editing PHP in HTML files, uploading them to a web server, and making them available online. There will also be an introduction to programming in PHP, to help enable you to later adapt the examples to address your more advanced examples and projects.

Session 2 will extend the simpler exercises in Session 1, adding more options and capabilities, as well as providing new and more advanced examples. Using the tools and techniques from Session 1, there will be opportunities to adjust and partly customise the examples, and if time permits potentially begin a small exercise of your own.

PowerPoint 2016: Further Use (Self-paced) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Friday 3 March

09:30
Excel 2016: Functions [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course covers some of the more challenging functions such as IF, SUMIFS and VLOOKUP. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Monday 6 March

10:00
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (1 of 3) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (1 of 3) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (2 of 3) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

Tuesday 7 March

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

PowerPoint 2016: Introduction [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • This course gives a "quick start" introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint which is a widely used software application for preparing presentations
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (3 of 3) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

Microsoft SharePoint 2013/Online: For Your Institution new [Full] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course introduces the features of SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online which are part of the University's Microsoft EES Agreement.

It's aim to cover topics that will assist institutions in evaluating SharePoint 2013 or Online for their institutional requirements.

During the course there will be discussion on how to improve attendees work process using SharePoint fro existing users.