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University Information Services course timetable

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Fri 22 Nov – Mon 9 Dec

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Friday 22 November

14:00
Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (3 of 3) In progress 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

Tuesday 26 November

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (1 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

Adobe InDesign CC: Introduction to Desktop Publishing [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe InDesign CC is the industry leading page design and layout application. You will build up a publication from ready-prepared text, images and graphics in the same way as QuarkXpress and PageMaker.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

10:00
EndNote: Introduction to a Reference Management Program (Self-paced) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

An introduction to using the bibliography program EndNote to store references and notes and use them to achieve correct referencing in your documents without re-typing. This course covers both EndNote Desktop and the free, browser based, "lite" version, EndNote Online.

Using EndNote will enable you to keep a note of references as you research online so that you will always be able to document your sources correctly. It can save you time as you should never need to retype references and you can alter their layout with a couple of mouse-clicks.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction [Places] 10:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

13:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (2 of 3) [Full] 13:30 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

Wednesday 27 November

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (3 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

14:00
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

Thursday 28 November

09:30
Web Authoring: HTML - For Beginners (Level 1) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for people new to writing Web pages. Only the basics of HTML (hypertext mark-up language) will be covered, but there are other courses for those wishing to extend their knowledge. The course teaches how to write HTML from scratch using a basic Text Editor and focuses on content and structure as opposed to style. By the end of the course participants will have created four personal linked web pages and had the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

Excel 2016: Analysing and Summarising Data [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This hands-on course is a follow up from the Excel: Introduction course.

11:00
UIS Staff L&D: Unconscious Bias and Inclusivity (Workshop) [Places] 11:00 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Auditorium

Unconscious Bias happens automatically, without conscious control, when our brains make quick judgements or assessments about people and situations. Combatting unconscious bias isn’t about blame. It’s about accountability.

This session will provide an introduction to implicit or unconscious bias and will help you start to understand how our biases influence the decisions we make.

Monday 2 December

09:30
Web Authoring: HTML - Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for Beginners (Level 2) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML. The course will introduce Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and show how they can (and should) be used effectively when creating web pages. The course teaches how to write CSS from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of four pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish these using DS-Web.

Tuesday 3 December

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

Wednesday 4 December

09:30
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (1 of 3) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Access 2016: Further Use (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

Thursday 5 December

09:30
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (2 of 3) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Web Authoring (Level 3): CSS - Cascading Style Sheets Responsive Web Design [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This is a practical-based course for anyone with a basic understanding of HTML and CSS and follows on from the Web Authoring (Level 1): HTML For Beginners and Web Authoring (Level 2): CSS - Cascading Style Sheets for Beginners courses. The course shows how to implement a Responsive Web Design using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and basic JavaScript. The course teaches how to write CSS Media Queries from scratch using a basic Text Editor. By the end of the course participants will have adapted a small website consisting of four pages so that it is styled using a single Cascading Style Sheet and JavaScript to make it responsive on both computer screens and mobile devices. Course participants will have the opportunity to publish their web pages using DS-Web.

Research Computing: Infrastructure as a Service (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

The Research Computing Infrastructure as a Service (RCIS) provides instant high performance compute, storage, network resources and other functionality. It helps avoid the expense and complexity of buying and managing your own physical servers and other data centre infrastructure. It enables IT practitioners and research groups to build their own scalable platforms that fit their exact needs and requirements. Departmental IT or Research Groups are able to submit an application here to rent a portion of the available cloud resources, on which to build their own research computing platforms without needing to first provision physical hardware in their home department.

Please register your interest in the course and we will be in touch when we have finalised dates.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

13:30
Research Computing: Infrastructure as a Service (2 of 2) [Places] 13:30 - 16:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

The Research Computing Infrastructure as a Service (RCIS) provides instant high performance compute, storage, network resources and other functionality. It helps avoid the expense and complexity of buying and managing your own physical servers and other data centre infrastructure. It enables IT practitioners and research groups to build their own scalable platforms that fit their exact needs and requirements. Departmental IT or Research Groups are able to submit an application here to rent a portion of the available cloud resources, on which to build their own research computing platforms without needing to first provision physical hardware in their home department.

Please register your interest in the course and we will be in touch when we have finalised dates.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Friday 6 December

09:30
Unix: Building, Installing and Running Software (3 of 3) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

It is common for a student or researcher to find a piece of software or to have one thrust upon them by a supervisor which they must then build, install and use. It is a myth that any of this requires system privilege. This course demonstrates the building, installation and use of typical software ranging from trivially easy examples (the "configure, make, install" scheme) through to the evils of badly written Makefiles. Common errors and what they mean will be covered and by the end of the course the student should be able to manage their own software without needing to pester their system administrator.

Excel 2016: Recorded Macros [Places] 09:30 - 11:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course covers recording macros which provides automated steps to produce outcomes. This course does not teach VBA programming, if you want to learn VBA then please see the self-taught course Programming in VBA - Using Microsoft Excel 2013. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Monday 9 December

09:00
IT Support Staff: University Data Network (UDN) & Troubleshooting Skills for First Line University IT Staff [Places] 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This introductory course will provide an understanding of the University Data network (UDN), how different university institution’s networks connect to it and the networking services that the University Information Services (UIS) provide centrally.

It will cover common troubleshooting issues and provides the opportunity to discuss best practice in a range of scenarios and to use operating system utilities to diagnose problems locally at institutions. It will identify the scenarios of when a networking issue would be escalated to UIS service desk and the information to provide.

The course is largely hands on using group work and will conclude with a group quiz (just for fun!).

14:30
UIS Staff: Diversity - Trans Awareness Workshop new [Places] 14:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Auditorium
  • An interactive workshop for those who would like to increase their understanding of trans people and transphobia.
  • The aim of the session is not only to enhance participants' confidence in speaking about trans issues but also to provide them with tools to reflect on their role in the transmission of transphobia, and to build their capacity to challenge transphobia.