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Mon 17 Jun – Thu 4 Jul

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Wednesday 19 June

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (1 of 3) [Standby] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing For Scientific & Technical Publications (1 of 2) [Full] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a high-quality typesetting system; it includes features designed for the production of technical and scientific documentation. LaTeX is the de facto standard for the communication and publication of scientific documents. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes.

When would I use LaTeX instead of Microsoft Word? For scientific and technical documentation/thesis and when submitting articles to Journals that require LaTeX.

13:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (2 of 3) [Standby] 13:30 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing For Scientific & Technical Publications (2 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a high-quality typesetting system; it includes features designed for the production of technical and scientific documentation. LaTeX is the de facto standard for the communication and publication of scientific documents. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes.

When would I use LaTeX instead of Microsoft Word? For scientific and technical documentation/thesis and when submitting articles to Journals that require LaTeX.

Thursday 20 June

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Those with Programming Experience (3 of 3) [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This full-day course introduces the Python programming language to those who are already familiar with another high level programing language such as C/C++, Fortran, Java, Perl or Visual Basic. The aim of this course is to give such programmers sufficient familiarity with Python that they can attend any of the more advanced Python courses organised by the Computing service and easily follow any of the widely available Python tutorials on the more complex aspects of the language.

This course covers all the material contained in the "Programming: Python for Absolute Beginners" course, but in a more abbreviated fashion suitable for those who already have significant programming experience. This course does NOT cover the more complex aspects of the language (for such topics see the other Computing Service Python courses), nor is there much explicit discussion of the object oriented features of Python.

If you are an accomplished and experienced programmer you may find this course too slow, you may prefer to self-teach the course rather than attend in person, the full set of notes can be downloaded.

Video Production: Shoot, Edit and Upload (Workshop) (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 Judge Business School, Keynes House (KH107)

A practical workshop covering the workflow of producing a piece of edited video for upload to the web. The workshop will give participants a better understanding of video cameras, microphones and lighting; effective use of a video camera including shot composition and technical considerations. Basic editing techniques will be taught and participants will have the opportunity to edit a short video, encode and upload to the web.

Excel 2016: Analysing and Summarising Data [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This hands-on course is a follow up from the Excel: Introduction course.

High Performance Computing: An Introduction (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course aims to give an introductory overview of High Performance Computing (HPC) in general, and of the facilities of the High Performance Computing Service (HPCS) in particular.

Practical examples of using the HPCS clusters will be used throughout, although it is hoped that much of the content will have applicability to systems elsewhere.

13:30
High Performance Computing: An Introduction (2 of 2) [Full] 13:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course aims to give an introductory overview of High Performance Computing (HPC) in general, and of the facilities of the High Performance Computing Service (HPCS) in particular.

Practical examples of using the HPCS clusters will be used throughout, although it is hoped that much of the content will have applicability to systems elsewhere.

14:00
Video Production: Shoot, Edit and Upload (Workshop) (2 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 16:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

A practical workshop covering the workflow of producing a piece of edited video for upload to the web. The workshop will give participants a better understanding of video cameras, microphones and lighting; effective use of a video camera including shot composition and technical considerations. Basic editing techniques will be taught and participants will have the opportunity to edit a short video, encode and upload to the web.

Friday 21 June

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (2 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

Tuesday 25 June

10:00
Save Time and Increase Your Productivity with Dragon NaturallySpeaking [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

Countless busy professionals are now turning to speech recognition to speed up creating documents and streamlining their workflow.

This course will focus on how to use Dragon NaturallySpeaking for education to improve accuracy and will show you how to customise the software for your writing style.

The aim of this course is to teach you how to achieve 99% accuracy with Dragon NaturallySpeaking so that you spend less time correcting mis-recognitions and more time dictating text at speeds of up to 140 words per minute!

With Dragon you are only limited to the speed you can think - come and learn how get Dragon working for you!

See success stories of how Dragon is being used by education.

Wednesday 26 June

09:00
UTBS: New Provider Training Manager Training [Places] 09:00 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is designed for the Training Manager(s) of a new provider on the University Training Booking System. (UTBS) and it will take them through theory and practicals on how to manage their training programme on the UTBS

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (3 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

Thursday 27 June

09:30
Excel 2016: Functions [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course covers some of the more challenging functions such as IF, SUMIFS and VLOOKUP. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Friday 28 June

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (4 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction [Full] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

Tuesday 2 July

09:30
Python 3: Advanced Topics (Self-paced) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series and is suitable for people who have Python experience equivalent to either of the introductory courses: Introduction for Absolute Beginners or Introduction for Programmers

These sessions consist of a selection of self-paced mini-courses, each taking at most a half-day. Python expert(s) from the UCS will be present to answer questions or address difficulties with these. Attendees can select from the available topics to most closely meet their individual needs. Attendees are welcome to attend more than one session to work through multiple topics. If an attendee finishes a topic with time to spare they may select another, and so on.

Wednesday 3 July

09:30
NVivo: An Introduction for Qualitative Research [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course will introduce NVivo a Computer Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) which supports qualitative and mixed methods research. It provides a means to collect, organise and analyse content from interviews, focus group discussions, surveys and audio.

UTBS: New Provider Training Administrator Training [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is designed for Training Administrators of a new provider on the University Training Booking System (UTBS) and it will take them through theory and practicals on how to administer their training programme on the UTBS.

Thursday 4 July

09:30
Access 2016: Further Use (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is intended for those already using Microsoft Access 2016 who wish to explore more advanced queries and forms. Those who have attended the Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database course will find this follows on seamlessly from where that course left off - but be prepared for a harder challenge. Part of the course explores relational database design concepts for simple databases. The remainder focuses on more advanced queries and forms. The second session is optional for you to either work through and consolidate the course material, or to receive support on your own project.

Excel 2016: Recorded Macros [Places] 09:30 - 11:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course covers recording macros which provides automated steps to produce outcomes. This course does not teach VBA programming, if you want to learn VBA then please see the self-taught course Programming in VBA - Using Microsoft Excel 2013. Not all chapters will be taught in full due to time constraints but are included for self-study.

Research Computing: Infrastructure as a Service new (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The Research Computing Infrastructure as a Service (RCIS) provides instant high performance compute, storage, network resources and other functionality. It helps avoid the expense and complexity of buying and managing your own physical servers and other data centre infrastructure. It enables IT practitioners and research groups to build their own scalable platforms that fit their exact needs and requirements. Departmental IT or Research Groups are able to submit an application here to rent a portion of the available cloud resources, on which to build their own research computing platforms without needing to first provision physical hardware in their home department.

Please register your interest in the course and we will be in touch when we have finalised dates.

13:30
Research Computing: Infrastructure as a Service new (2 of 2) [Places] 13:30 - 16:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The Research Computing Infrastructure as a Service (RCIS) provides instant high performance compute, storage, network resources and other functionality. It helps avoid the expense and complexity of buying and managing your own physical servers and other data centre infrastructure. It enables IT practitioners and research groups to build their own scalable platforms that fit their exact needs and requirements. Departmental IT or Research Groups are able to submit an application here to rent a portion of the available cloud resources, on which to build their own research computing platforms without needing to first provision physical hardware in their home department.

Please register your interest in the course and we will be in touch when we have finalised dates.