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Courses per page: 10 | 25 | 50 | 100


FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can your researchers tell if their research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can help your researchers make their data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with teams from FOSTER Open Science and the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your chosen dataset, including any problems you encountered. We will also discuss guidelines on how to best support researchers in making their data FAIR. Find further details here about How FAIR is that research data?: a workshop (for research support staff including librarians and administrators in all disciplines).

The course is open to any staff involved in supporting researchers.

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can you tell if your own research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can start to make your own data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify your own data, or a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with FOSTER and the Research Data Team from the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your data, including any problems you encountered. You are welcome to bring examples of your data to this session to further develop your skills, or try your hand at FAIRifying more example datasets from Apollo. Find further details here about How FAIR is your research data?: a workshop (for researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines).

The course is open to researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines - arts, humanities and social sciences as well as sciences, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine.

Journal article versions new Self-taught Bookable

Where and how can you share your articles? Each article goes through different versions, from submitted manuscript, through accepted manuscript, proof, and finally version of record. Often the text is very similar, but subtle differences mean that one version can be legally shared and another cannot. In this course, you will learn how to identify article versions and apply the correct terminology.

The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.  

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book. 

IMPORTANT BOOKING INFORMATION: This event is free of charge for participants who have a Raven password and booking can be made directly from this webpage. For those who do not have a Raven password there will be a charge of £50 to attend the event. Please visit our esales form to make a booking.

Programme highlights:

Professor Martin Eve (Birbeck, University of London) will present on the economics and political-economics of open-access monograph publishing.

Professor Margot Finn (President of the Royal Historical Society) will discuss open monographs from the perspectives of the RHS.

Matt Day (Head of Open Research Policy & Partnerships, Cambridge University Press) will talk about monographs and the open research landscape from a publisher’s perspective.

Panel session 1: ‘Policy and practice: Moving towards Plan S and REF’. Chair: Steven Hill (Research England). Panel: Prof Martin Eve (Birbeck, University of London), Prof Margot Finn (President of RHS), Prof Roger Kain (School of Advanced Study, University of London & Chairman of the UUK OA Monographs Group), Hannah Hope (Wellcome Trust). 

Panel session 2: ‘Innovations in open monograph publishing’. Chair: Patricia Killiard (Deputy Director, Academic Services, Cambridge University Library). Panel includes representatives from: Cambridge University Press, UCL Press, Open Book Publishers, Springer Nature and Radical Open Access. 

A detailed programme schedule can be found further below.

Dear esteemed author...

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at whether these publishers are a problem, how to spot a potential problem publisher or conference and the best advice to offer researchers if they are approached.

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles

2 other events...

Date Availability
Mon 7 Oct 2019 14:00 [Places]
Fri 8 Nov 2019 14:00 [Places]