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Graduate School of Life Sciences course timetable

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Tue 1 Dec – Tue 23 Mar 2021

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December 2020

Tue 15

This training is for those whose research involves the use of animals in research, and who want to feel more confident to talk about it with those outside the lab. This training will be run by Understanding Animal Research.

January 2021

Mon 25

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project. Topics: • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals? • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

Course structure: Monday 10am-11am: Introduction to PE Wednesday 2pm-3pm: Evaluation and online PE tips and hints and opportunities at the University Friday 10am-12pm: Do you have any questions? 1:1 advice sessions (not mandatory to attend!)

Wed 27

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project. Topics: • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals? • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

Course structure: Monday 10am-11am: Introduction to PE Wednesday 2pm-3pm: Evaluation and online PE tips and hints and opportunities at the University Friday 10am-12pm: Do you have any questions? 1:1 advice sessions (not mandatory to attend!)

Fri 29

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project. Topics: • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals? • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

Course structure: Monday 10am-11am: Introduction to PE Wednesday 2pm-3pm: Evaluation and online PE tips and hints and opportunities at the University Friday 10am-12pm: Do you have any questions? 1:1 advice sessions (not mandatory to attend!)

February 2021

Mon 8
The Engaged Researcher Online: Research Storytelling (1 of 3) [Full] 14:00 - 15:30 Online

Capturing your audience’s attention and keeping it is vital for any type of public engagement. Having a good story to tell and then telling it in a compelling way enables you to connect with a wide audience. This module takes you through the art and science of storytelling: exploring attention and motivation, dramatic structure, rhetorical devices, visual enhancements, and peripheral influences so that you can craft your own engaging story.

Wed 10
The Engaged Researcher Online: Research Storytelling (2 of 3) [Full] 09:00 - 10:00 Online

Capturing your audience’s attention and keeping it is vital for any type of public engagement. Having a good story to tell and then telling it in a compelling way enables you to connect with a wide audience. This module takes you through the art and science of storytelling: exploring attention and motivation, dramatic structure, rhetorical devices, visual enhancements, and peripheral influences so that you can craft your own engaging story.

Fri 12
The Engaged Researcher Online: Research Storytelling (3 of 3) [Full] 14:30 - 15:30 Online

Capturing your audience’s attention and keeping it is vital for any type of public engagement. Having a good story to tell and then telling it in a compelling way enables you to connect with a wide audience. This module takes you through the art and science of storytelling: exploring attention and motivation, dramatic structure, rhetorical devices, visual enhancements, and peripheral influences so that you can craft your own engaging story.

Mon 15

Successful engagement with the public can benefit research, researchers and the public – but how do you go about demonstrating this change? Evaluation of engagement doesn’t just help us demonstrate the value of our PE initiatives but can help bring us closer to our audiences by giving the public a strong clear voice. This workshop will guide you through the best evaluation processes showing you When, Why and crucially How to use evaluation to give you reliable and clear data. Demonstrate success to funders; record Impact for REF; learn how to improve your processes and have a better understanding of the people you are connecting with. This course is going to be run by Jamie Galagher: Jamie is an award-winning freelance science communicator and engagement professional. He has delivered training around the world, from skyscrapers of Hong Kong to tents in the African bush. Having had four years’ experience as the central PE lead for the University of Glasgow he has worked on improving the reach, profile and impact of research engagement in almost every academic discipline. Specialising in evaluation Jamie provides consultancy services to charities and universities helping them to demonstrate their impact and understand their audiences and stakeholders. Jamie is also an associate editor of the Research for All journal. He was named as one of the “100 leading practising scientists in the UK” by the Science Council and as one of the “175 Faces of Chemistry” by the Royal Society of Chemistry. He won the International 3 Minute Thesis Competition and Famelab Scotland. www.jamiebgall.co.uk @jamiebgall

Tue 16

Successful engagement with the public can benefit research, researchers and the public – but how do you go about demonstrating this change? Evaluation of engagement doesn’t just help us demonstrate the value of our PE initiatives but can help bring us closer to our audiences by giving the public a strong clear voice. This workshop will guide you through the best evaluation processes showing you When, Why and crucially How to use evaluation to give you reliable and clear data. Demonstrate success to funders; record Impact for REF; learn how to improve your processes and have a better understanding of the people you are connecting with. This course is going to be run by Jamie Galagher: Jamie is an award-winning freelance science communicator and engagement professional. He has delivered training around the world, from skyscrapers of Hong Kong to tents in the African bush. Having had four years’ experience as the central PE lead for the University of Glasgow he has worked on improving the reach, profile and impact of research engagement in almost every academic discipline. Specialising in evaluation Jamie provides consultancy services to charities and universities helping them to demonstrate their impact and understand their audiences and stakeholders. Jamie is also an associate editor of the Research for All journal. He was named as one of the “100 leading practising scientists in the UK” by the Science Council and as one of the “175 Faces of Chemistry” by the Royal Society of Chemistry. He won the International 3 Minute Thesis Competition and Famelab Scotland. www.jamiebgall.co.uk @jamiebgall

Mon 22

Children are our next generation of researchers and as an audience for Research Engagement, they can be both rewarding and challenging. More than ever, online content plays an important role in reaching and inspiring children of different age groups for research. With so much content already out there how to make new and relevant content online? What are parents and teachers looking for? What safeguarding considerations should you have? This course will aim to answer these and other questions and provide guidance in creating content.

Monday session 1: - Introduction to producing engaging online content with children and instructions on how to develop the project throughout the week. Wednesday Session 2: - Mentoring time for questions or one-on-one advise. Friday Session 3: - showcase of the projects.

Tue 23

This session aims to give you tools to manage your relationships with business and industry, charities, and other non-academic partners. The session is suitable for researchers and facilitators looking to future-proof their impact partnerships and co-creation relationships. We will use case studies from the arts, humanities and social sciences.

We’ll cover the basics of intellectual property management, licensing of co-created resources and research outputs, and academic consultancy. Above all we want to support you to ensure a sustainable, fair, future-proof foundation for scalable real-world impact.

The sessions on Friday, 26 February and Monday, 1 March gives the opportunity to the participants to have a 30 minute 1:1 session with the trainers to discuss issues and queries relating to their own project.

Wed 24

Children are our next generation of researchers and as an audience for Research Engagement, they can be both rewarding and challenging. More than ever, online content plays an important role in reaching and inspiring children of different age groups for research. With so much content already out there how to make new and relevant content online? What are parents and teachers looking for? What safeguarding considerations should you have? This course will aim to answer these and other questions and provide guidance in creating content.

Monday session 1: - Introduction to producing engaging online content with children and instructions on how to develop the project throughout the week. Wednesday Session 2: - Mentoring time for questions or one-on-one advise. Friday Session 3: - showcase of the projects.

Fri 26

This session aims to give you tools to manage your relationships with business and industry, charities, and other non-academic partners. The session is suitable for researchers and facilitators looking to future-proof their impact partnerships and co-creation relationships. We will use case studies from the arts, humanities and social sciences.

We’ll cover the basics of intellectual property management, licensing of co-created resources and research outputs, and academic consultancy. Above all we want to support you to ensure a sustainable, fair, future-proof foundation for scalable real-world impact.

The sessions on Friday, 26 February and Monday, 1 March gives the opportunity to the participants to have a 30 minute 1:1 session with the trainers to discuss issues and queries relating to their own project.

Children are our next generation of researchers and as an audience for Research Engagement, they can be both rewarding and challenging. More than ever, online content plays an important role in reaching and inspiring children of different age groups for research. With so much content already out there how to make new and relevant content online? What are parents and teachers looking for? What safeguarding considerations should you have? This course will aim to answer these and other questions and provide guidance in creating content.

Monday session 1: - Introduction to producing engaging online content with children and instructions on how to develop the project throughout the week. Wednesday Session 2: - Mentoring time for questions or one-on-one advise. Friday Session 3: - showcase of the projects.

March 2021

Mon 1

This session aims to give you tools to manage your relationships with business and industry, charities, and other non-academic partners. The session is suitable for researchers and facilitators looking to future-proof their impact partnerships and co-creation relationships. We will use case studies from the arts, humanities and social sciences.

We’ll cover the basics of intellectual property management, licensing of co-created resources and research outputs, and academic consultancy. Above all we want to support you to ensure a sustainable, fair, future-proof foundation for scalable real-world impact.

The sessions on Friday, 26 February and Monday, 1 March gives the opportunity to the participants to have a 30 minute 1:1 session with the trainers to discuss issues and queries relating to their own project.

Tue 2

This week-long training will focus on Public Engagement and Policy. The week will start with a first session introducing the policy sector, possible forms of policy collaboration for researchers and professionals, the skills and competences needed and practical tips to immediately start your policy engagement. Because of the current context requiring many of us to work from home, the second session will be specifically dedicated to „branding“ yourself online when reaching out to relevant policy actors. The third session will consist of an interactive meeting during which participants will pitch their research to stress its policy relevance. Instructions will be circulated during the week. There will also be available slots for personal and group mentoring. The training is open to early and mid-career researchers and professional staff willing to enhance their understanding of policy engagement.

This training will be led by Dr. Maja Spanu, Junior Research Fellow and Affiliated Lecturer to the Department of Politics and International Studies in Cambridge and postdoc lead for Humanities and Social Science fort the University’s Public Engagement Advisory Group.

Structure of the training:

Tuesday 10 am-11.15 am: Session I Introductory Session + Q&A

Wednesday 11 am-12.15 pm; Session II Branding: Linkedin and CV + Q&A

Thursday 11am-12pm or 3pm-4pm: Mentoring: available for 15-minute 1:1 sessions for direct advice on personal branding and other Q&As.

Friday 2pm-3.45pm: Session III Pitching your Research: Interactive session with pitching + participants’ feedback"

Wed 3

This week-long training will focus on Public Engagement and Policy. The week will start with a first session introducing the policy sector, possible forms of policy collaboration for researchers and professionals, the skills and competences needed and practical tips to immediately start your policy engagement. Because of the current context requiring many of us to work from home, the second session will be specifically dedicated to „branding“ yourself online when reaching out to relevant policy actors. The third session will consist of an interactive meeting during which participants will pitch their research to stress its policy relevance. Instructions will be circulated during the week. There will also be available slots for personal and group mentoring. The training is open to early and mid-career researchers and professional staff willing to enhance their understanding of policy engagement.

This training will be led by Dr. Maja Spanu, Junior Research Fellow and Affiliated Lecturer to the Department of Politics and International Studies in Cambridge and postdoc lead for Humanities and Social Science fort the University’s Public Engagement Advisory Group.

Structure of the training:

Tuesday 10 am-11.15 am: Session I Introductory Session + Q&A

Wednesday 11 am-12.15 pm; Session II Branding: Linkedin and CV + Q&A

Thursday 11am-12pm or 3pm-4pm: Mentoring: available for 15-minute 1:1 sessions for direct advice on personal branding and other Q&As.

Friday 2pm-3.45pm: Session III Pitching your Research: Interactive session with pitching + participants’ feedback"

Fri 5

This week-long training will focus on Public Engagement and Policy. The week will start with a first session introducing the policy sector, possible forms of policy collaboration for researchers and professionals, the skills and competences needed and practical tips to immediately start your policy engagement. Because of the current context requiring many of us to work from home, the second session will be specifically dedicated to „branding“ yourself online when reaching out to relevant policy actors. The third session will consist of an interactive meeting during which participants will pitch their research to stress its policy relevance. Instructions will be circulated during the week. There will also be available slots for personal and group mentoring. The training is open to early and mid-career researchers and professional staff willing to enhance their understanding of policy engagement.

This training will be led by Dr. Maja Spanu, Junior Research Fellow and Affiliated Lecturer to the Department of Politics and International Studies in Cambridge and postdoc lead for Humanities and Social Science fort the University’s Public Engagement Advisory Group.

Structure of the training:

Tuesday 10 am-11.15 am: Session I Introductory Session + Q&A

Wednesday 11 am-12.15 pm; Session II Branding: Linkedin and CV + Q&A

Thursday 11am-12pm or 3pm-4pm: Mentoring: available for 15-minute 1:1 sessions for direct advice on personal branding and other Q&As.

Friday 2pm-3.45pm: Session III Pitching your Research: Interactive session with pitching + participants’ feedback"

Tue 9

This course will cover how to use Social Media tools for Public Engagement. The course will be delivered by the Social Media and AV team.

Thu 11

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

Fri 12

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

Tue 16

Improvised comedy, better known simply as “improv”, describes a wide variety of theatrical forms which all share the key characteristic that content, scenes, and characters are creating spontaneously by the performers. Successful improvisors embody a set of core skills, summarized by the phrase “Yes, and…”, which can be readily taught and learnt, and which can be used by practicing scientists and science communicators to provide a framework for more effective communication and collaboration. Although born in very different contexts, improv’s core skills embody the values underpinning the shift to more participatory and dialogic forms of public engagement in the UK in recent decades.

This training is an unashamedly entertaining and enjoyable introduction to improv for scientists hoping to do better when undertaking challenging intellectual tasks in front of others and when interacting with others when you wish to be—and wish to be seen to be—responsive to their perspectives and opinions. The training is not about being funny or making people laugh, but is instead about the underlying skills which lead to successful improv, and no one should be put off for a fear of “not being funny enough”.

As a highly interactive training, everyone must be minimally comfortable talking in front of others in order to get the most out of the course.

Thu 18

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

Fri 19

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

Tue 23

Improvised comedy, better known simply as “improv”, describes a wide variety of theatrical forms which all share the key characteristic that content, scenes, and characters are creating spontaneously by the performers. Successful improvisors embody a set of core skills, summarized by the phrase “Yes, and…”, which can be readily taught and learnt, and which can be used by practicing scientists and science communicators to provide a framework for more effective communication and collaboration. Although born in very different contexts, improv’s core skills embody the values underpinning the shift to more participatory and dialogic forms of public engagement in the UK in recent decades.

This training is an unashamedly entertaining and enjoyable introduction to improv for scientists hoping to do better when undertaking challenging intellectual tasks in front of others and when interacting with others when you wish to be—and wish to be seen to be—responsive to their perspectives and opinions. The training is not about being funny or making people laugh, but is instead about the underlying skills which lead to successful improv, and no one should be put off for a fear of “not being funny enough”.

As a highly interactive training, everyone must be minimally comfortable talking in front of others in order to get the most out of the course.