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Monday 18 November

09:00
CUL: Book a Buddy! new Not bookable 09:00 - 09:30 Cambridge University Library: Entrance Hall
  • Nervous or intimidated about visiting the UL for the first time?
  • Don’t know where to begin with a Literature search?
  • Can never find the books you need on the open shelves?

Book a buddy!

Email reference@cam.ac.uk to arrange a session. Tell us what you need help with and we’ll match you with a member of library staff who can show you what you need to know, whether it’s searching the catalogue, using Electronic Legal Deposit, finding open shelf books or something else entirely.

Don't suffer in silence - Book a buddy!

09:30
Tableau for Explorers - Research [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 Finance Division, Greenwich House, Ferrara Room (IT Training Room)

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations

Tableau Explorer is intermediate level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view, interact and edit Tableau content.

The Engaged Researcher: Shooting your research video new [Places] 09:30 - 16:30 Postdoc Centre@ Mill Lane, Eastwood Room

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A video is a great way to spread the message of your research to different public audiences across the World! Attendees will be equipped with the skills needed to plan and shoot high quality footage for your very own research-video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video session.

(Lunch will be provided)

Effective Undergraduate Supervision (Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03c


This course complements the supervising training and information your Department will provide. It is a course that consists of: an online module, which introduces practices and principles of undergraduate supervision at Cambridge, and a face-to-face workshop in which you will explore challenges and approaches to supervising.

By the end of this course you will know:

  • the purpose of supervisions at Cambridge
  • how to deal with common supervision scenarios
  • how to provide effective feedback
  • the practicalities of starting to supervise

Topics covered:

  • Introduction to supervising (including what supervisions are, format, preparing for them)
  • Background information for those who need it (British education system, Cambridge undergraduate system)
  • Role of a supervisor
  • Dealing with different supervision scenarios
  • Departmental information
  • Summary of what you have learnt
  • Practical tips and advice
  • Resources for ongoing support and information
Recruitment Administration System (RAS) [Places] 09:30 - 12:45 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is for those who are new to the Recruitment Administration System (RAS) or those who wish to have a refresher.

Chemical Safety [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 Greenwich House, Heidelberg Room

A safety course for anyone either directly working with chemicals or who is responsible for persons working with chemicals including PIs, Post Grads, Post Docs and technicians.

Amazon Web Services: Architecting on AWS new charged (1 of 6) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

The UIS are hosting this 3rd party delivered course.

This course covers the fundamentals of building IT infrastructure on the AWS platform. Students learn how to optimize the AWS Cloud by understanding how AWS services fit into cloud-based solutions. In addition, students explore AWS Cloud best practices and design patterns for architecting optimal IT solutions on AWS, and build a variety of infrastructures in guided, hands-on activities. The course also covers how to create fledgling architectures and build them into robust and adaptive solutions.

More information can be found online

Please see the fee section below before booking on the course.

10:00
Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA 2) (3 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA-1) (3 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Chemistry: CT9 Atomic Force Microscopy (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Unilever Lecture Theatre

Since introduction in 1986 by Binnig, Quate and Gerber, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as one of the most powerful scanning probe microscopy technique. The possibility to acquire three-dimensional morphology maps of specimens on a surface in both air and in their native liquid environment with sub-nanometre resolution makes it a very versatile single molecule technique. A conventional AFM topography map provides valuable information on the morphology and structure of heterogeneous biological samples, while single molecule force spectroscopy can interrogate the biophysical and nanomechanical properties of the sample at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the combination of AFM with spectroscopic modes enable to enquire the optical properties of the sample with nanoscale resolution. In these introductory lectures, the general capabilities of AFM with respect to other scanning probe and electron microscopy techniques will be discussed. The general principles governing the functioning of AFM in contact and tapping mode will be given, as well as the principles enabling the study of nanomechanical properties of samples by force spectroscopy and nanomechanical imaging. Other modes such as scattering SNOM, AFM-IR and Raman will be generally discussed. The course will provide the necessary background to acquire a morphology map by AFM. The last session will consist of a hand-on session introducing the students to the use and functioning of an AFM instrument.

CULP: French Intermediate 1 for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 10:00 - 11:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading French documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

The course aims to develop strategies for reading longer texts faster through close analysis, grammatical and stylistic commentary, and translation. For example, literary texts with differing editions, stories with two or more translations into English that need to be compared and evaluated, poems of challenging originality or range of allusion.

Classes will be conducted in English, but there will be many opportunities to use French and practise reading aloud.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

Amicus Reports overview new CANCELLED 10:00 - 11:00 Cambridge University Development and Alumni Relations, Training Room Suite 2

For users unfamiliar with the reports area in Amicus, this give you a quick overview of how reports are used in Amicus. We will look at the work that you do in your team and how it goes towards generating valuable reports used by all users of Amicus We will cover the following areas:

  • Amicus Reporting Services
  • Dashboard
  • The report button within Amicus
MBTI: Understanding Personality in a Research Environment CANCELLED 10:00 - 16:00 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03d

Ever wonder why you seem to ‘click’ with one person and not another? Ever wonder why you might find some things easier to do than others? The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) might shed some light on these questions.

Why this course might make a difference

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator presents a framework to help you understand yourself and others, by exploring differences and preferences in four areas of your personality. As a result of this exploration you may work more effectively and be more understanding in your relationships with others.

Led by a qualified MBTI practitioner, the workshop comprises working through the MBTI questionnaire and self-assessment exercises, so that participants can:

  • Understand the concept and theories behind the MBTI types and process to obtain a personal profile
  • Explore the differences and preferences within personalities in research-related scenarios

Course feedback:

“I had known about the Myers-Briggs, but I hadn't understood the different dimensions fully, or their interactions at a deeper level. Between explanations and activities, the course really helped me to understand the Myers-Briggs perspective, and to be aware of personal and professional differences between my friends and colleagues.”

“The contents of this training and the design of the teaching were very attractive and interesting. I think this training is very useful and helpful, and will recommend it to my friends and other students in my department in the future.”

ESRC DTP: Training and Engagement - First Years new [Places] 10:00 - 16:00 17 Mill Lane, Seminar Room B

First Year ESRC DTP Students Only

Training and Engagement Day

CUL: Introduction to Music Collections new [Places] 10:00 - 10:45 Cambridge University Library: Entrance Hall

A guided tour through the open stacks and Anderson Room (Music Reading Room) at the University Library. This will provide an overview of the wealth of music materials held here, and how to find them. There’s also a look at the digital resources available, and an overview of other music resources at the UL.

10:30
Departmental Safety Officer Essentials [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 Greenwich House, Jaffna Room

If you are a newly appointed Departmental Safety Officer, you should attend this course within three months of appointment where possible. Space permitting, we also welcome current DSOs and others with a health and safety role.

The topics are also covered in other courses that are open to all comers.

JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Full] 10:30 - 10:50 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

10:50
JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Full] 10:50 - 11:10 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

11:00
CULP: Spanish Basic 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 11:00 - 13:00 Faculty of English, GR05

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

11:10
JTC: Speaking Practice for learners of Arabic new [Places] 11:10 - 11:30 John Trim Centre

Speaking practice with an Arabic native-speaker volunteer

11:30
CULP: French Intermediate 2 for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 11:30 - 13:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading French documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

The course aims to develop strategies for reading longer texts faster through close analysis, grammatical and stylistic commentary, and translation. For example, literary texts with differing editions, stories with two or more translations into English that need to be compared and evaluated, poems of challenging originality or range of allusion.

Classes will be conducted in English, but there will be many opportunities to use French and practise reading aloud.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

Falcon-on-Drupal: Update and Q&A session new [Places] 11:30 - 12:30 Institute of Criminology, Room B3

A presentation and Q&A session to discuss the migration of websites to Falcon-on-Drupal – a new version of the Falcon website content management system (CMS) service based on the Drupal platform.
Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions about the development, service features and the migration of their own sites.

12:00
Chemistry: CT9 Atomic Force Microscopy (2 of 2) [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 UB7

Since introduction in 1986 by Binnig, Quate and Gerber, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as one of the most powerful scanning probe microscopy technique. The possibility to acquire three-dimensional morphology maps of specimens on a surface in both air and in their native liquid environment with sub-nanometre resolution makes it a very versatile single molecule technique. A conventional AFM topography map provides valuable information on the morphology and structure of heterogeneous biological samples, while single molecule force spectroscopy can interrogate the biophysical and nanomechanical properties of the sample at the nanoscale. Furthermore, the combination of AFM with spectroscopic modes enable to enquire the optical properties of the sample with nanoscale resolution. In these introductory lectures, the general capabilities of AFM with respect to other scanning probe and electron microscopy techniques will be discussed. The general principles governing the functioning of AFM in contact and tapping mode will be given, as well as the principles enabling the study of nanomechanical properties of samples by force spectroscopy and nanomechanical imaging. Other modes such as scattering SNOM, AFM-IR and Raman will be generally discussed. The course will provide the necessary background to acquire a morphology map by AFM. The last session will consist of a hand-on session introducing the students to the use and functioning of an AFM instrument.

CULP: Russian Basic 1 for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 12:00 - 13:30 Faculty of English, Board Room

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading Russian documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

Students are encouraged to bring along their own texts and work in pairs to enhance the learning experience.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: French Intermediate 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 12:00 - 14:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

More detailed information is available on our website.

JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Places] 12:00 - 12:20 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

12:20
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Full] 12:20 - 12:40 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

12:30
Admissions Interviewing: Equality and Diversity Matters [Places] 12:30 - 13:45 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03a


A review of ways in which equality and diversity issues relate to admissions interviewing. Participants will consider possible responses to a number of case studies in order to explore what ‘good practice’ really means

Please note: this course addresses equality and diversity considerations and is not a substitute for participation in the Admissions Selection Workshops. New interviewers are asked to register for one of the Admissions Selection Workshops, for an introduction to Cambridge’s admissions selection process, including discussion of how interviews and admissions decisions relate to the University’s agreement with the Office for Fair Access (OFFA). Note that the Admissions Selection Workshops also include opportunities to practise by interviewing current first-year undergraduates

12:40
JTC: Speaking practice for learners of Chinese new [Full] 12:40 - 13:00 John Trim Centre

A 20-minute session providing a chance to practice Chinese pronunciation, tones and general conversation.

13:00
JTC: German Advanced Conversation Hours charged (5 of 6) In progress 13:00 - 14:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

This conversation hour offers learners with an independent conversational ability (B2/C1 level upwards) a chance to practice speaking German with others in a relaxed and informal group led by a native-speaker facilitator. The content of the sessions is decided by the participants, with members taking turns to propose a topic and source materials (newspaper articles, web links, video etc.) to use as a basis for discussion. The groups are ideal for those who wish to retain or improve upon the language skills they already have or for those studying for a language degree who would like another forum for low-pressure, informal practice. This is also a great follow-up activity for CULP German learners and can be repeated year after year.

Previous participants from German Advanced CULP are warmly invited to attend the German Conversation Hour.

If the course is already 'in progress' please click on 'register your interest' in order to book a place.

CULP: French Intermediate 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 13:00 - 15:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available on our website.

CULP: Italian Basic for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 13:00 - 14:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

This course will start at Basic level and move quickly through the basics of Italian grammar. Students with some background in the Italian language (Intermediate level) are most welcome to join the group in January (Lent term) when we start reading more complex, original texts.

Using close reading and translation of academic texts from their particular discipline, this weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading Italian documents that they have come across or may meet in their research.

Students will be encouraged to bring along their own texts and work in pairs to enhance the learning experience. For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

13:30
Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) Checks and Recruitment Practices [Full] 13:30 - 15:30 Greenwich House, Edmonton Room


This session will provide staff with an overview of the Disclosure and Barring Service and how to request criminal record checks for eligible roles within the University.

Amazon Web Services: Architecting on AWS new charged (2 of 6) [Places] 13:30 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

The UIS are hosting this 3rd party delivered course.

This course covers the fundamentals of building IT infrastructure on the AWS platform. Students learn how to optimize the AWS Cloud by understanding how AWS services fit into cloud-based solutions. In addition, students explore AWS Cloud best practices and design patterns for architecting optimal IT solutions on AWS, and build a variety of infrastructures in guided, hands-on activities. The course also covers how to create fledgling architectures and build them into robust and adaptive solutions.

More information can be found online

Please see the fee section below before booking on the course.

14:00
Diary Methodology (4 of 4) In progress 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This four-part workshop series provides an introduction to using solicited diaries as a research tool. The main goal of the course is to add diary methodology to students’ research toolboxes. It is a flexible and versatile tool that has been used by researchers in many fields, including public health, nursing, psychology, media studies, education, and sociology. The workshop is suitable for anybody interested in learning more about the method and/or using diaries in their research.

The course covers the use of qualitative and quantitative types of diaries, both as a self-standing tool and as a part of mixed-method research designs. The lectures and workshops aim to provide theoretical and practical foundations, as well as first-hand experience with solicited diaries as a research tool. The course also provides unique insights into diary data analysis and its challenges.

The course is equally driven by lectures and student participation/practicums. The initial workshop (Week 1) provides a solid theoretical introduction to the diary methodology, including the history of the method, qualitative and quantitative variants, modes of delivery, and use of technology. The follow-up workshops sequentially advance this knowledge base through practical exercises and discussions (Weeks 2 & 4), as well as a specialist lecture (Week 3) on data management, participant communication, ethics and data analysis.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA-1) (4 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Doing Qualitative Interviews (2 of 3) In progress 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 3

Face-to-face interviews are used to collect a wide range of information in the social sciences. They are appropriate for the gathering of information on individual and institutional patterns of behaviour; complex histories or processes; identities and cultural meanings; routines that are not written down; and life-history events. Face-to-face interviews thus comprise an appropriate method to generate information on individual behaviour, the reasons for certain patterns of acting and talking, and the type of connection people have with each other.

The first session provides an overview of interviewing as a social research method, then focuses on the processes of organising and conducting qualitative interviews. The second session explores the ethics and practical constraints of interviews as a research method, particularly relevant when attempting to engage with marginalised or stigmatised communities. The third session focuses on organisation and analysis after interviews, including interpretation through coding and close reading. This session involves practical examples from qualitative analysis software. The final session provides an opportunity for a hands-on session, to which students should bring their interview material (at whatever stage of the process: whether writing interview questions, coding or analysing data) in order to receive advice and support in taking the interview material/data to the next stage of the research process.

Topics:

1. Conducting qualitative interviews

2. Ethics and practical constraints

3. Practical session: interpretation and analysis

Unix: Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

No previous experience of shell scripting is required for this course; however some knowledge of the interactive use of the bash shell is a prerequisite (see Simple Shell Scripting for Scientists: Prerequisites for details).

This course introduces shell scripting in bash for scientific computing tasks. Day one introduces very basic shell scripts in bash which process the command line in a simple fashion. Day two covers how to write more advanced shell scripts in bash. Day three covers how to make one's shell scripts more robust.

At the end of each day one or more exercises are set. It is VERY IMPORTANT that attendees attempt these exercises before the next day of the course. Attendees should make sure that they have allowed themselves sufficient study time for these exercises between each day of the course.

CULP: German Intermediate 1 for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 14:00 - 15:30 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

This weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading German documents they need to deal with in their research. Each session will be divided into two parts:

The first part will consist of grammar, tasks to develop insight into the reading process, help with dealing with complex sentence structures, academic conventions, abbreviations, etc.

The second part will be devoted to the translation of original German texts from different periods and covering a range of topics. Each week you will be asked to attempt a translation into English of a German passage. Students will be encouraged to bring along German texts from their own research to translate.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

The seven secrets of highly successful PhD students (Engineering RDC Division D) new Not bookable 14:00 - 15:30 Department of Engineering, Civil Engineering Building, Seminar Room (1-33)

RDC sessions play a crucial role in helping graduate students develop the skills they need to successfully complete their PhD and prepare them for their future careers. These sessions are a vital opportunity for students to learn about the research of others in related fields and thus gain an awareness of the activities in their own research group and the wider Department. They also play a critical role in improving the students’ ability to write and present their research in English which is essential to success at their first year assessment.

All first year students in Div D are expected to participate in all sessions, unless they are attending an RDC run by another division in agreement with their supervisor. Attendance for each session will be logged and recorded as part of students’ individual training records


The Senior Tutors' Committee expects those involved in the undergraduate admissions selection process to receive appropriate training. These workshops cover the entire selection process as well as interviewing techniques. Led by Admissions Tutors, they are designed to help you make your contribution to the admissions selection process as effective as possible. They include opportunities to practise by interviewing current first-year undergraduates, using authentic paperwork, and they explain how interviews and admissions decisions relate to the University’s agreement with the Office for Fair Access (OFFA).

The workshop will focus on mock interviews, with first-year undergraduates in related disciplines, and on discussion with an Admissions Tutor. We have asked all volunteer interviewees to consent to our circulating their application papers to participants in advance of the workshop, so that you may consider possible approaches to interviewing mock applicants. Closer to the date of the session we will send you copies of the handouts by email, to be printed and taken with you to the session.

Before attending the workshop, please study the online module. This module provides an overview of Cambridge's undergraduate admissions process and highlights some important principles and practices relating to conducting effective admissions.

14:15
CUL: Behind the scenes in the Music Collections at the UL new [Places] 14:15 - 15:30 Cambridge University Library: Entrance Hall

Ever wondered what lies behind the scenes of the Music Department at the UL? Following a quick tour of the open stacks, Music Department staff will take you to delve into the odd architecture of South Court, say hello to our elephants, meet some of our rarest and tiniest books, and discover why music librarians sometimes need to be good detectives. There’ll also be a guide to finding music, for those who haven’t used our card catalogues before.

15:00
CULP: Italian Basic 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At basic 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Russian Basic 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 Sidgwick Site, Lecture Block, Room 12

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence. At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available from on our website.

CULP: German Advanced charged (5 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At advanced level the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater to the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

NB: Advanced courses are official, award-bearing University qualifications.

Please also note that the certificates and transcripts are usually issued in July.

CULP: French Basic 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available on our website.

CULP: Spanish Intermediate 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 15:00 - 17:00 Faculty of History, Seminar Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

JTC: English speaking practice new [Full] 15:00 - 15:20 John Trim Centre
A relaxed one-to-one practice speaking session with volunteer native speaker

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not back to back.

15:20
JTC: English speaking practice new [Full] 15:20 - 15:40 John Trim Centre
A relaxed one-to-one practice speaking session with volunteer native speaker

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not back to back.

15:30
CULP: German Basic (total beginners) for Academic Purposes (LAP) (5 of 15) In progress 15:30 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

This weekly class is intended to help research students in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences to develop their skills in reading German documents they need to deal with in their research. Each session will be divided into two parts:

The first part will consist of grammar, tasks to develop insight into the reading process, help with dealing with complex sentence structures, academic conventions, abbreviations, etc.

The second part will be devoted to the translation of original German texts from different periods and covering a range of topics. Each week you will be asked to attempt a translation into English of a German passage. Students will be encouraged to bring along German texts from their own research to translate.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

15:40
JTC: English speaking practice new [Full] 15:40 - 16:00 John Trim Centre
A relaxed one-to-one practice speaking session with volunteer native speaker

Please book no more than 2 sessions per week and not back to back.

16:00
Reading and Understanding Statistics (4 of 4) In progress 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for students who don’t plan to use quantitative methods in their own research, but who need to be able to read and understand published research using quantitative methods. You will learn how to interpret graphs, frequency tables and multivariate regression results, and to ask intelligent questions about sampling, methods and statistical inference. The module is aimed at complete beginners, with no prior knowledge of statistics or quantitative methods.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA 2) (4 of 4) Not bookable 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

17:00
CULP: Russian Intermediate 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages, Room 207

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence. At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please go to the Language Centre CULP page.

CULP: French Intermediate 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

More detailed information is available on our website.

CULP: Italian Intermediate 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of English, GR05

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

CULP: Spanish Basic 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At a basic level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Italian Intermediate 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence. At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

CULP: Spanish Advanced charged (5 of 15) In progress 17:00 - 19:00 Faculty of History, Seminar Room 2

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At an advanced level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

One of the aims of the advanced level courses is also presentation skills as the courses aim to cater for the academic needs (i.e. research, conferences) of the students.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

NB: Advanced courses are official, award-bearing University qualifications.

Please also note that the certificates and transcripts are usually issued in July.

18:30
CULP: Languages for Medics (SSC), French Intermediate 2 2019 - BLOCK B (7 of 10) Not bookable 18:30 - 20:30 Clinical School, Seminar Room 12

Language courses for Y4 students of the School of Clinical Medicine.

19:00
CULP: Spanish Intermediate 1 charged (5 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 1

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 1 level, the focus is on every day and real-time, oral/aural communication. Each course features a functional-notional syllabus and grammar points are analysed in context.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: Chinese (Mandarin) Intermediate 1 new charged (5 of 15) CANCELLED 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 4

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

More detailed information is available from the Language Centre website.

CULP: Japanese Elementary 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 2

The courses are delivered in a blended-learning mode, face-to-face and online through CamTools (the Cambridge University virtual learning environment). The focus is on spoken, oral/aural communicative competence. Students are required to attend to online multimedia materials and read the proscribed texts in their own time so that the classroom time is dedicated to face-to-face communication/discussion.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.

CULP: German Intermediate 2 charged (5 of 15) In progress 19:00 - 21:00 17 Mill Lane Teaching Room 3

The Programme offers general language tuition with a focus on communicative competence.

At intermediate 2 level, the focus shifts slightly towards reading and writing whilst still offering plenty an opportunity for oral communication. The syllabus is more topical and the contents feature many a cultural, historical, political and current affairs theme. While the grammar is analysed within a context, explicit grammar instruction becomes an integral part of the course.

For more detailed information about the course please visit our website.