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University Information Services - Digital Literacy Skills course timetable

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Thu 11 Apr 2019 – Tue 7 May 2019

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Tuesday 16 April 2019

09:00
ARCHER, UK Tier 2 & PRACE: Modern C++ for Computational Scientists new (1 of 4) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

Since the 2011 revision to the C++ language and standard library, the ways it is now being used are quite different. Used well, these features enable the programmer to write elegant, reusable and portable code that runs efficiently on a variety of architectures.

However it is still a very large and complex tool. This set of online lectures, delivered over two Wednesday afternoons and including practical exercises, will cover a minimal set of features to allow an experienced non-C++ programmer to get to grips with language.

These include:

  • overloading
  • templates
  • containers
  • iterators
  • lambdas and standard algorithms.

It concludes with a brief discussion of modern frameworks for portable parallel performance which are commonly implemented in C++.

  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.
14:00
ARCHER, UK Tier 2 & PRACE: Modern C++ for Computational Scientists new (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

Since the 2011 revision to the C++ language and standard library, the ways it is now being used are quite different. Used well, these features enable the programmer to write elegant, reusable and portable code that runs efficiently on a variety of architectures.

However it is still a very large and complex tool. This set of online lectures, delivered over two Wednesday afternoons and including practical exercises, will cover a minimal set of features to allow an experienced non-C++ programmer to get to grips with language.

These include:

  • overloading
  • templates
  • containers
  • iterators
  • lambdas and standard algorithms.

It concludes with a brief discussion of modern frameworks for portable parallel performance which are commonly implemented in C++.

  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.

Wednesday 17 April 2019

09:00
ARCHER, UK Tier 2 & PRACE: Modern C++ for Computational Scientists new (3 of 4) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

Since the 2011 revision to the C++ language and standard library, the ways it is now being used are quite different. Used well, these features enable the programmer to write elegant, reusable and portable code that runs efficiently on a variety of architectures.

However it is still a very large and complex tool. This set of online lectures, delivered over two Wednesday afternoons and including practical exercises, will cover a minimal set of features to allow an experienced non-C++ programmer to get to grips with language.

These include:

  • overloading
  • templates
  • containers
  • iterators
  • lambdas and standard algorithms.

It concludes with a brief discussion of modern frameworks for portable parallel performance which are commonly implemented in C++.

  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.
14:00
ARCHER, UK Tier 2 & PRACE: Modern C++ for Computational Scientists new (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

Since the 2011 revision to the C++ language and standard library, the ways it is now being used are quite different. Used well, these features enable the programmer to write elegant, reusable and portable code that runs efficiently on a variety of architectures.

However it is still a very large and complex tool. This set of online lectures, delivered over two Wednesday afternoons and including practical exercises, will cover a minimal set of features to allow an experienced non-C++ programmer to get to grips with language.

These include:

  • overloading
  • templates
  • containers
  • iterators
  • lambdas and standard algorithms.

It concludes with a brief discussion of modern frameworks for portable parallel performance which are commonly implemented in C++.

  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.

Thursday 18 April 2019

10:30
Falcon on Drupal: Migration from Falcon On Plone - An Introduction Finished 10:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course has been designed for web editors of institutions that are migrating from the Falcon on Plone content management system to the new Falcon on Drupal Content Management Service.

Wednesday 24 April 2019

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) Finished 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Thursday 25 April 2019

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

14:00
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (2 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

Tuesday 30 April 2019

09:00
Relational Database Design Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, RIS Room

This course gives a simple introduction to organizing your data in a relational database. It aims to explain the arranging of your data. It does not deal with specific relational databases systems such as Access, Oracle or SQL Server, or the technical tools that you would or could use to set up your database. The course aims to provide you with enough information to sit down and design your database, regardless of the database product that you intend to use. Exercises will be done on paper, without using computers.

09:30
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (1 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (2 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (3 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

12:30
IT Community: CamSIS Improvement Programme - Lessons Learnt new Finished 12:30 - 13:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Auditorium

UIS staff will share what worked well and what could have been done better or differently to deliver work within the programme. Topics will range from system testing to user engagement.

13:30
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (4 of 4) Finished 13:30 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Wednesday 1 May 2019

09:30
Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 New Museums Site, Hopkinson Lecture Theatre

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

10:00
EndNote: Introduction to a Reference Management Program (Self-paced) Finished 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

An introduction to using the bibliography program EndNote to store references and notes and use them to achieve correct referencing in your documents without re-typing. This course covers both EndNote Desktop and the free, browser based, "lite" version, EndNote Online.

Using EndNote will enable you to keep a note of references as you research online so that you will always be able to document your sources correctly. It can save you time as you should never need to retype references and you can alter their layout with a couple of mouse-clicks.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction Finished 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

14:00
Word 2016: Mastering Dissertations and Theses (Level 3) POSTPONED 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is mainly aimed at students writing their thesis. It is a task-focused version of the Word: Mastering Advanced Features which is aimed at staff creating reports. Please do not book yourself on both courses. It is designed to give a overview of the advanced features of Microsoft Word that are most relevant to producing dissertations, theses and other long documents.

14:15
TechLink Community Seminar: Research Computing Services new Finished 14:15 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Auditorium

The Research Computing Services division has recently launched a new service which provides infrastructure as a service (IaaS) capability. The service provides instant high-performance compute, storage, network resources and other functionality. It helps to avoid the expense and complexity of buying and managing your own physical servers and other data centre infrastructure. It enables IT practitioners and research groups to build their own scalable platforms that fit their exact needs and requirements. More information can be found here https://www.hpc.cam.ac.uk/research-computing-cloud-services

The research Computing Services team will present Research Computing Cloud service capabilities and details about the platform that the service is built on. There also will be a live demo of the platform and a Q&A session.

Thursday 2 May 2019

09:30
Web Authoring (Level 1): HTML - For Beginners Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

In this the first of three courses, this practical-based course is for people new to writing Web pages. Only the basics of HTML (hypertext mark-up language) will be covered. The course teaches how to write HTML from scratch using a basic Text Editor and focuses on content and structure as opposed to style. By the end of the course participants will have created four personal linked web pages. For those wishing to extend their knowledge the second course in this series Web Authoring (Level 2): CSS - Cascading Style Sheets for Beginners introduces CSS styling elements which will add colour and styling to the HTML web site created in this course. The third course in this series Web Authoring (Level 3): CSS - Cascading Style Sheets Responsive Web Design introduces Media Queries to make the web site responsive for use on both large screen and mobile phones.

14:00
MySQL: Implementing a Relational Database Design (1 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This beginners course equips you with the skills to implement a relational database design entity relationship diagram (ERD) into a MySQL database. Please be prepared for a fast paced course, but the materials provided can be used for consolidation after the course.

Friday 3 May 2019

09:30
MySQL: Implementing a Relational Database Design (2 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This beginners course equips you with the skills to implement a relational database design entity relationship diagram (ERD) into a MySQL database. Please be prepared for a fast paced course, but the materials provided can be used for consolidation after the course.

14:00
Word 2016: Mastering Dissertations and Theses (Level 3) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, 17 Mill Lane Training Room

This course is mainly aimed at students writing their thesis. It is a task-focused version of the Word: Mastering Advanced Features which is aimed at staff creating reports. Please do not book yourself on both courses. It is designed to give a overview of the advanced features of Microsoft Word that are most relevant to producing dissertations, theses and other long documents.

Tuesday 7 May 2019

09:30
Adobe Illustrator CC: Introduction Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Illustrator CC is a the industry leading professional illustration and drawing program for the creation of vector based graphics and artwork.

Please note: This course requires that you use your CRSid and Raven password to log into Adobe Creative Cloud. If you currently log in to use Microsoft Office, then the same login details are used, and you do not need to do anything except to know your Raven password.

Otherwise, if you do not know your password, or have not changed your Raven password in the last three years, you must do so before attending the course, please go here: https://password.csx.cam.ac.uk/ you can set the same password.

Please arrive to START THE COURSE PROMPTLY in order to set up the Adobe environment, if you don’t then you may find it more difficult to follow the instructor.

14:00
Zotero: Introduction to a Reference Management Program (Self-paced) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is an introduction to reference management using the free, open-source program, Zotero. Zotero is a free plug-in for the Firefox web browser which allows you to collect and store references from online sources; add your own annotations and finally use your stored references to insert correct citations into a Word, Open Office, or LaTeX document.

Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.