skip to navigation skip to content
Providers & themes
Find theme:
Select provider / theme

All courses

Show:
Show only:

Showing courses 1801-1900 of 2068
Courses per page: 10 | 25 | 50 | 100

This 1-week course aims to provide an introduction to the best practices and tools needed to perform bioinformatics research effectively and reproducibly.

Focusing on solutions around handling biological data, we will cover introductory lessons in data manipulation and visualisation in R, statistical analyses, and reproducibility. The R component of the course will cover from basic steps in R to how to use some of the most popular R packages (dplyr and ggplot2) for data manipulation and visualisation. No prior R experience or previous knowledge of programming/coding is required. The course also includes introductory sessions in statistics and working examples on how to analyse biological data. At the end of the course we will address issues relating to reusability and reproducibility.

More information about the course can be found here.

This course is run in collaboration with the Institute of Continuing Education.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.


If you are new to supervising graduate students at Cambridge (studying both for one-year courses or PhDs) the Board of Graduate Studies strongly recommends you to take part in some form of professional development. In collaboration with BGS, the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning offers training and support for newly-appointed supervisors of graduate students and for those new to the Cambridge system. The workshops, which run over lunchtime, are designed to consider reciprocal expectations and duties, as well as approaches to supervising, and to raise awareness of possible issues and where to go for support.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Tue 21 Jan 2020 12:30 [Places]


This course if for staff at the Biomed Campus only

If you are new to supervising graduate students at Cambridge (who are studying both for one-year courses or PhDs) the Board of Graduate Studies strongly recommends you to take part in some form of professional development. In collaboration with BGS, the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning offers training and support for newly-appointed supervisors of graduate students and for those new to the Cambridge system. The workshops, which run over lunchtime, are designed to consider reciprocal expectations and duties, as well as approaches to supervising, and to raise awareness of possible issues and where to go for support.


If you are new to supervising graduate students at Cambridge (who are studying both for one-year courses or PhDs) the Board of Graduate Studies strongly recommends you to take part in some form of professional development. In collaboration with BGS, the Cambridge Centre for Teaching and Learning offers training and support for newly-appointed supervisors of graduate students and for those new to the Cambridge system. The workshops, which run over lunchtime, are designed to consider reciprocal expectations and duties, as well as approaches to supervising, and to raise awareness of possible issues and where to go for support.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Mon 20 Jan 2020 12:30 [Places]
Support for Migration To and Use Of Exchange Online new Tue 29 Aug 2017   10:00 Finished

This course is for IT Support Staff who may support users of Exchange Online. It will describe the mechanisms for migrations from Hermes and an on-premise Exchange service. The practical exercises will cover a range of operating systems and mail clients.

Please note that this is a one day course with two sessions and a break to lunch.


This participative, discussion based workshop will provide an opportunity to reflect on how students with mental health difficulties can be supported in postgraduate study. It will cover best practice in supporting students and update on services available to all involved.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Tue 21 Apr 2020 12:00 [Places]

This session will provide staff in HR related roles with an overview of how to best support managers with staff who are about to go on, or return from, a period of family leave.


This participative workshop will enable attendees to confidentially discuss their reactions to students in emotional distress and consider effective ways of supporting them while managing attendees' own boundaries.

The workshop will be conducted in a relaxed and open way and will result in those attending feeling more confident in these interactions.

The workshop will also update attendees on available sources of local support for students.

Survey Research and Design Mon 17 Feb 2020   15:00 [Full]

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. The module consists of three three-hour sessions, split between lectures and practical exercises.

At the start of the module, the theoretical aspects of designing surveys will feature more, and topics covered include: the background to and history of survey research (with examples mostly drawn from political polling); an overview of the issues involved in analysing data from surveys conducted by others and some practical advice on how to evaluate such data; issues of sampling, non-response and different ways of doing surveys; issues related to questionnaire design (question wording, answer options, etc.) and ethical considerations. These lectures are relevant for all students taking the module, irrespective of whether they will conduct surveys themselves or are 'passive' users of survey results.

As the module progresses the practical aspects of designing surveys will feature more, particularly issues directly related to questionnaires (and less on issues of sampling), such as the wording of questions, the order of questions, and the use of different answer options. Most of the exercises will be provided by the instructors, but there will also be opportunities for students to bring in examples of surveys they would like to develop for their own research (and participants in the sessions may be asked to answer each other's surveys as a pilot test). We encourage all students registered for the module to attend the more practical sessions, but it will be of most direct relevance to those who are using, or plan to use, surveys in their research.

This session will provide an overview of the support and resources available from libraries and other useful departments from across the University of Cambridge. It will also provide an introduction to the Researcher Development Programme STEMM sessions offered by library staff on a wide range of useful research themes and skills.

After this session, participants will have a better understanding of what services are out there to help support them in their time at Cambridge and who they can ask for help.

Symplectic Elements: An Introduction new Tue 9 Jul 2019   14:00 Finished
  • Introduction to the data Research Information Team hold on research outputs and their provenance
  • Introduction to the tools that can be used with them
  • Outlining the types of insight/intelligence that can be gathered from this activity
  • Opportunity to explore with the trainer what sort of data/insight/intelligence would help you in your work to help inform future direction of travel
Symplectic Refresher Training new Mon 7 Sep 2015   11:00 Finished

Symplectic Elements is the University's research information management system and feeds the Department's publications lists.

This refresher session covers keeping profiles up to date; managing and adding publication information; and refining the search terms to match publications and other activity with your account.

Delivered by Juergen Wastl of the University's Research Information team.

Systemslink training new Mon 25 Mar 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink training new Thu 7 Feb 2019   09:00 POSTPONED
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink Training new Wed 20 Feb 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink Training new Fri 25 Jan 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink Training new Unscheduled Not bookable
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink Training new Tue 25 Jun 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemslink is a database used to record utility use in departmental buildings, this system is not available for buildings operated by the NHS.
  • Departments can use Systemslink to track energy savings.
  • This training will provide an overview of the system and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink Training new Mon 11 Nov 2019   12:30 [Places]
  • Systemslink is a database used to record utility use in departmental buildings, this system is not available for buildings operated by the NHS.
  • Departments can use Systemslink to track energy savings.
  • This training will provide an overview of the system and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink training 19 July new Fri 19 Jul 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemslink is a database used to record utility use in departmental buildings, this system is not available for buildings operated by the NHS.
  • Departments can use Systemslink to track energy savings.
  • This training will provide an overview of the system and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink training 3 September new Tue 3 Sep 2019   09:00 Finished
  • Systemslink is a database used to record utility use in departmental buildings, this system is not available for buildings operated by the NHS.
  • Departments can use Systemslink to track energy savings.
  • This training will provide an overview of the system and an introduction on how to use it.
Systemslink training Dec 19 new Wed 19 Dec 2018   09:00 Finished
  • Systemlink is the software programme used to record energy use in the University’s buildings.
  • You can use Systemslink to monitor energy use in your building(s) and, in some buildings to identify areas for improvement.
  • This training will provide an overview of Systemslink and an introduction on how to use it.
Tableau Drop In Sessions Tue 22 Oct 2019   14:30   [More dates...] [Places]

This is an opportunity for the members of the University to go one-on-one with Tableau experts across the Business Information Team who can help you solve challenges.

17 other events...

Date Availability
Tue 22 Oct 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 22 Oct 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 29 Oct 2019 14:30 [Places]
Tue 29 Oct 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 29 Oct 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 5 Nov 2019 14:30 [Places]
Tue 5 Nov 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 5 Nov 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 12 Nov 2019 14:30 [Places]
Tue 12 Nov 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 12 Nov 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 19 Nov 2019 14:30 [Places]
Tue 19 Nov 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 19 Nov 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 26 Nov 2019 14:30 [Places]
Tue 26 Nov 2019 15:00 [Places]
Tue 26 Nov 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tableau for Explorers - Departmental Profiles Fri 8 Nov 2019   09:30 [Places]

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations

Tableau Explorer is intermediate level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view, interact and edit Tableau content.

Tableau for Explorers - Exam Results new Mon 16 Sep 2019   09:30 CANCELLED

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations

Tableau Explorer is intermediate level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view, interact and edit Tableau content.

Tableau for Explorers - Research Mon 18 Nov 2019   09:30 [Places]

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations

Tableau Explorer is intermediate level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view, interact and edit Tableau content.

Tableau for Viewers - Exam Results Wed 25 Sep 2019   09:30 Finished

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations.

Tableau Viewer is entry level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view Tableau content created by others.

Tableau for Viewers - Research Mon 11 Nov 2019   09:30 [Places]

Tableau Server is an online application available to all members of the university to access Tableau dashboards and visualisations.

Tableau Viewer is entry level access to Tableau Server and allows you to view Tableau content created by others.

Tai Chi Taster new Mon 28 Jan 2019   13:00 Finished

Come and enjoy a free Tai Chi class. There is much more to tai chi than one can see, and virtually no one can describe such a complex art in one simple sentence. It can be a meditation and an integral exercise for all parts of the body and the mind. It brings tranquillity and helps you think more clearly. Numerous studies have shown tai chi improves muscular strength, flexibility, fitness, improve immunity, relieve pain and improve quality of life. http://taichiofcambridge.com/

Take a Break: Press the Stress - Historical Printing new Tue 14 May 2019   16:30 Finished

Come to the Library’s Historical Printing Room. Set your name in type and hand-print an illustrated keepsake as a memento of your visit.

On top of the millions of books held at the University Library, we also have a considerable collection of printing artefacts. This began with a decision in the early 1970s to set up a bibliographical teaching press on the lines of those already existing at the Bodleian, University College London and elsewhere. The impetus for this plan came from the late Philip Gaskell, then Librarian of Trinity College. The main aim was to enable students of literature to understand the practical details of hand composition of type and of printing on a hand-press, and thus to appreciate the ways in which both conscious decisions and accidents in the printing house could affect the accuracy of a text.

http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/departments/rare-books/collections/historical-printing-room

Take a break: Twenty Minute UL Tower Tour new Fri 14 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

Take a break from revision stress with a twenty minute guided tour of the famous UL Tower. An experienced member of staff will take you up one of Cambridge's tallest structures where you can experience dazzling views of Cambridge as well as seeing some of the unique material that the tower holds.

Please be aware that access to the Tower is by lift/elevator only.

Cambridge Admissions Office has organised a series of briefing sessions in the coming weeks aimed at Schools Liaison Officers, Faculty/Department Outreach Staff, and any academics and staff members who will communicate with potential students.

This will be a practical session, which will explore different methods of identifying schools and students who meet widening participation targeting criteria. This session will focus on using tools available to identify these students, and the datasets CAO has available for members of University staff wishing to run UK based widening participation events.

Do you get nervous when teaching or lecturing? Are you speaking with a clear voice and being heard? Do you get the results you want from your communications with others at work?

This individually focused and completely confidential one-to-one coaching session for Cambridge staff with teaching responsibilities will help you refine your teaching and presentation skills, assist you to speak more confidently, and develop new approaches to your communication in a wide range of professional situations. Constructive feedback will give you insight into your speaking style, how you come across to others, and how well your ideas are communicated. Coaching will focus on your individual requirements, ranging from practical points about elocution and vocal projection, to holding the attention of a room of students and structuring a compelling lecture or presentation.

47 other events...

Date Availability
Wed 23 Oct 2019 09:30 [Full]
Wed 23 Oct 2019 10:30 [Full]
Wed 23 Oct 2019 11:30 [Full]
Wed 23 Oct 2019 13:30 [Full]
Wed 23 Oct 2019 14:30 [Full]
Wed 23 Oct 2019 15:30 [Full]
Mon 11 Nov 2019 10:30 [Full]
Mon 11 Nov 2019 11:30 [Full]
Mon 11 Nov 2019 13:30 [Full]
Mon 11 Nov 2019 14:30 [Full]
Mon 11 Nov 2019 15:30 [Full]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 09:30 [Places]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 10:30 [Places]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 11:30 [Full]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 13:30 [Full]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 14:30 [Full]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 15:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 09:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 10:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 11:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 13:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 14:30 [Places]
Tue 21 Jan 2020 15:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 09:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 10:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 11:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 13:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 14:30 [Places]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 15:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 09:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 10:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 11:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 13:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 14:30 [Places]
Tue 11 Feb 2020 15:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 09:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 10:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 11:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 13:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 14:30 [Places]
Mon 2 Mar 2020 15:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 09:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 10:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 11:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 13:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 14:30 [Places]
Thu 5 Mar 2020 15:30 [Places]
Teaching Associates' Programme (TAP) new Unscheduled Not bookable


The Teaching Associates’ Programme runs each year. For information about what the course involves and how to apply, please visit https://www.cctl.cam.ac.uk/tap. If you still have questions, please contact the course director, Dr Meg Tait (mebt1@cam.ac.uk).


The Teaching Associate Programme (TAP) is a year-long programme which supports early career researchers who have some responsibility for teaching and learning. TAP is accredited by the Higher Education Academy (HEA), and, if you successfully complete all elements of the programme, you will become an Associate Fellow of the HEA. In order to be eligible for Associate Fellowship of the HEA, you will need to have a minimum of 40 hours’ experience of teaching and/or supporting learning.

Applications are open to Postdoctoral Researchers/Research Staff and PhD students in their 2nd year or above, from any subject area. Prior to applying for TAP we require you to have at least 20 hours of teaching and at least 20 more hours of confirmed teaching for the academic year to come. In this way, the programme enables you to reflect on your own current practice, to explore ideas and approaches for enhancing your teaching, and to think about your future development as a higher education professional. Only higher education (university-level) teaching experience can be considered.

The programme has a high level of flexibility and participants are expected to plan their TAP work to fit around other activities. However, there are several compulsory components which cannot be missed and those include: four seminars, teaching observations, tutorial and lecturing practical. Help and support is available throughout the year to enable students to get the best from the programme.

Teaching Students with ADHD (Briefing) Thu 6 Feb 2020   12:45 [Places]


This course will consider the academic barriers experienced by students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It will cover a range of teaching environments and increase your awareness of best practice in implementing support. Most importantly it will give practical advice about best practice to ensure an effective learning environment for all involved


This course will consider the academic barriers experienced by students with Specific Learning Difficulties. It will cover a range of teaching environments and increase your awareness of best practice in implementing support. Most importantly it will give practical advice about best practice to ensure an effective learning environment for all involved. The course will focus on dyslexia, dyspraxia and dysgraphia.

Understanding Specific Learning Difficulties: Identification and Diagnosis (Briefing) is a useful precursor to this workshop, as it will not cover diagnosis or identification of specific learning difficulties.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Tue 25 Feb 2020 12:00 [Places]
Team training for Amicus new Unscheduled Not bookable

Does your team have lots of Amicus questions? Do you feel that as a team you will benefit from some Amicus training?

Using the Parallel Computing capabilities in MATLAB allows you to take advantage of additional hardware resources that may be available either locally on your desktop or on clusters and clouds. By using more hardware, you can reduce the cycle time for your workflow and solve computationally- and data-intensive problems faster.

In this seminar, we will discuss a range of workflows available to scale MATLAB applications with minimal changes to your MATLAB code and without needing to learn any shell or scheduler programming syntax.

TechLink Community: IT Forum new Wed 28 Nov 2018   14:00 Finished

University Information Services (UIS) is hosting an IT forum afternoon. The event will cover brief updates on UIS projects and services. Industry briefing sessions from Amazon Web Services (including merchandise giveaways) and Phoenix and a representative from Dell. There will also be shared projects from the IT community (Physics and the Healthcare Improvement Studies Insitute) .

TechLink Community: IT Forum Fri 29 Mar 2019   14:00 Finished

University Information Services (UIS) and the TechLink coordinators are hosting a second IT forum event. The afternoon event will cover UIS updates from the Infrastructure and DevOps Divisions and a representative from Dell.

  • 14:15-14:25: Introduction to IT Portfolios. Mark Rowland will give a brief overview of what the Portfolios are and who in the University is responsible for each element.
  • 14:25-14:55: The UIS Accessibility Working Group will update on work going on to ensure that we provide accessible services. They will highlight plans for institutions that will need to adapt to review the accessibility of their own websites and services and to write accessibility statements. There'll be a demo of screen reading technology working with inaccessible materials, and the difference that a few relatively simple updates can make to improve the experience for all.
  • 14:55-15:05: Rich Wareham from UIS DevOps will share what UIS's technology staff hope to achieve by starting a new Community of Practice following a recent unconference event.
  • 15:05-15:15: Break
  • 15:15-15:50: Phoenix Software (our Microsoft Office365 partners) will update on some of the shared Office 365 experience across the University, including how some institutions are using Mimecast, such as for GDPR compliance. - POSTPONED
  • 15:50-16:00: The recent Oxford IT Forum Conference was another excellent combination of talks and workshops, and vendor interaction. Brief highlights of the day will be provided by Ronald Haynes, along with ideas about further expanding our collaborative IT efforts with Oxford.
  • 16:00-16:30: Celebratory refreshments -This will be the final seminar of this academic year, and as usual, there will be some light refreshments to celebrate the end-of-term!

The Research Computing Services team will provide an update on some recent and engaging developments by the division, including:

  • An overview of current CSD3 (Cambridge Service for Data-Driven Discovery) platforms as well as some key news about planned upgrades in the forthcoming months.
  • The Data Accelerator - high performance, all-flash ephemeral storage for a new kind of scratch tier. New storage offering for the most demanding science workloads.
  • Bare metal cloud with Openstack - taking a peek into the future of the research computing infrastructure.
  • Secure Research Computing Platform - Using OpenStack, GitlabTerraform, Ansible to deliver secure (and movable) computing environments. Includes a demonstration.

There will also be a brief TechLink Community update, including an overview of a developing joint pilot for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) with Cambridge, Oxford, Glasgow, Edinburgh (COGENT).

Handling the large volume of spam, ransomware and other malware delivered via email to often indignant users has become quite a large part of standard IT duties over the past few years. Along with the increasing complexity of the tricks and techniques used by hacker groups for spearphishing and delivering malware, it is clearly apparent that there is only so much that professional IT staff can expect from their users in terms of determining what is, and is not, malware or phishing.

Yet the pressure on often relatively junior administrative and financial staff has not decreased and the time taken to try and work out what is genuine and what is not does not make for smooth time management. Most important of all, IT practitioners must not indulge in the blame culture when an incident happens, simply because the person blamed will probably never "own up" to making a possible mistake again. A positive culture - even admitting "Yes, it has happened to me" - is essential to encourage users to be open about mistakes.

This seminar will attempt to show some of the more common of the latest spammer tricks, and introduce some tools which (hopefully) will make your life easier.

The Business Information Team within Academic and Financial Planning and Analysis (AFPA) - formerly Planning Resource Allocation Office makes data for reporting and analysis for different parts of the University. They are currently using a Tableau Server for publishing and sharing their reports and data sources, to enable their data users to access the information, interact with the data, and create their own analysis in a safe environment.

In this presentation, the Business Information Team will show you how the Tableau Server operates and some of the work they are doing. They will present the structure of their Tableau site, the active directory groups, and the people and projects that are live and using Tableau across the University Administrative Services.

The Tableau Server core license is available to all members of the University. AFPA has implemented the administrative site, while UIS are developing a strategy to implement the Teaching and Research sites.

TechLink: Induction Day for new IT Staff new Fri 24 Nov 2017   09:00 Finished

Induction Day for new IT Staff

This day-long session introduces how IT works in the University of Cambridge, its idiosyncrasies and governance, what is expected of an IT professional working within the collegiate university and what resources are available for them. It covers IT specific material and does not duplicate the PPD Introductory Conference. The programme for the day is:

9:00-9:30 Registration
9:30-9:50 Welcome to Cambridge
9:50-10:30 IT within the University
10:30-10:50 Coffee
10:50-11:30 The user
11:30-12:10 The network
12:10-13:30 Lunch — representatives from various service groups will be milling around to talk to
13:30-14:10 Your responsibilities
14:10-14:50 University-wide services
14:50-15:10 Coffee
15:10-15:50 Building the IT community
15:50-16:00 Conclusion and End

Kieren Lovell and Dr David Modic, from the Computer Laboratory, will be presenting on the most common attack vectors for Social Engineering, and connecting the research to practical advice for Researchers and Staff travelling to areas of increased risk.

As an experiment, we are looking to run this event in webinar format. Joining instructions will be e-mailed to those that have signed up by 11am on the day.

TechLink Seminar: The Blue Active Directory new Wed 22 Feb 2017   14:15 Finished

Bob Dowling will be talking about Blue, the UIS' Active Directory, what options it creates for Institutional IT staff and plans for further development.

TechLink Seminar: The Cyber Security Programme new Wed 22 Mar 2017   14:15 Finished

With the recent opening of the National Cyber Security Centre, Cyber Security is a phrase that we will soon be hearing a lot more frequently. Cassie Bradley, the Programme Manager for the UIS' Cyber Security initiative, will be talking about the projects that are in progress and introducing some of the people involved in making the University a more secure place to work.

Ashley Culver, Head of the UIS Security Operations Centre Security Engineering team, will talk about the teams two current large projects:

  • The Managed Firewall Service
  • The Intrusion Detection Service
TechLink Seminar: The Year Ahead new Wed 18 Oct 2017   14:15 Finished

Prof. Ian Leslie, the interim Director of UIS, will be presenting our annual view of the coming year in University IT.

Wojciech Turek, head of the Research Computing Platforms team and service owner for storage services will provide an overview of the recently released UIS storage services for research data and how they can benefit researchers and help to improve way researchers store and process data. Wojciech will also provide insight into the development of the forthcoming institutional storage service and Storage Self-Service portal. Matt Raso-Barnett and Paul Browne will look under the hood of the current storage services and provide insight into the storage platforms and how we built them.

Estonia has been at the forefront of Tech for a decade. Voting, taxes, prescriptions, and a whole lot more, are all online. Internet access is a right, laid down in the law.

Now, everyone can have the digital benefits that an Estonian takes for granted. Kieren Lovell will help you find out more on how you too can become a digital e-Estonian nomad.

Admin note: This will be presented as a webinar. The booking form lists a room as this is a requirement of the training booking system but there will be no activity in this room. Instead you should connect with a Flash-capable web browser and headphone or speakers from the comfort of your own Institution.

Technician Conference 2019 Thu 12 Sep 2019   09:45 Finished

A half day conference highlighting and supporting the vital work carried out by technicians across the University.

A course for Telephone Liaison Officers to learn the features of the Telecoms Administration Systems.

Text and Data Mining: One Year On new Thu 12 Apr 2018   14:00 Finished

In February 2017, about 30 library staff met to discuss what University of Cambridge libraries could offer in the way of Text and Data Mining Services. Since then, various initiatives, discussions and events to move this issue forward have taken place. In this meeting a summary of the last year's activities, with particular emphasis on the main outcomes, will be presented, there will be an update on some initiatives currently in progress and there will be an opportunity to discuss the way ahead.

The session will take place at the Department of Chemistry in the Todd-Hamied Meeting Room.

The Office of Scholarly Communication is participating in an RLUK Workshop on the topic of libraries and Text and Data Mining (T&DM) on 9 March this year.

We invite you to join the OSC and our colleagues from the University Library and Affiliated Libraries for a round table discussion on what we can expect libraries to do in the area of T&DM.

The key aims of the session are to share experiences about T&DM, and to discuss the questions and requirements we might have in terms of developing a support service.

We will explore:

  • some background on what T&DM is
  • the legal situation with T&DM
  • who is doing what - and how?
Text and Data Mining Symposium new charged Wed 12 Jul 2017   10:30 Finished

The nature of research is changing. What is the potential of text & data mining (TDM)to impact on this? How are researchers today using TDM to cope with the ever-increasing amount of information available? Are funder and publisher policies adapting to reflect both the legal right UK researcher have to mine published literature and the new possibilities TDM now present? These are some of the questions we will be asking in this day of talks, workshops and discussions.

Join plenary speaker Kiera McNeice of the FutureTDM project, Cambridge researchers and the National Centre for Text Mining, along with guest speakers from UCL, PLOS and more to discover:

  • practical tips for TDM
  • what TDM tools are available
  • advice on supporting researchers using, or considering using, TDM
  • improving the quality of research through TDM
  • innovations in TDM – new uses for technologies in research

Coffee and lunch will be provided and the day will end with a summer drinks reception.

There is a charge for this event. These charges are:

  • £10 for University of Cambridge members
  • £50 for all other attendees

Once you have booked your place here, please follow this link to make your payment: http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/university-library/text-data-mining-symposium/text-data-mining-symposium

Can't make the symposium? Watch the opening Plenary and closing roundtable discussions via live-stream from 11:00 on Wednesday 12 July by following this link: http://cam.adobeconnect.com/osc2/ Simply select to 'Enter as Guest' (no need to create an Adobe Connect account).

You can also catch up when the recordings are available on the Office of Scholarly Communication 'Recordings of Past Events' page: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/events/recordings-past-events

A program for the day can be found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1l4N2fSFgpL3iMbjKC3IxHz7GpNVvERB5NzxqWp8jZQo/edit?usp=sharing

That Was The Year That Was: 2016 (For Librarians) Fri 20 Jan 2017   12:00 Finished

We warmly invite you to join us to hear what the Office of Scholarly Communication has been up to over the past twelve months.

This is an opportunity to find out more about who we are, what Scholarly Communication is, and what we've been doing within the Cambridge libraries community and the wider University. Learn about some of the exciting projects that are underway, locally and as part of the international field of Scholarly Communication.

We hope you can join us for the whirlwind tour!

The Art of Negotiation and Influence Wed 4 Mar 2020   09:00   [More dates...] [Places]

When opportunities come along, do you feel confident about working with people to get what you need? This course gives you a practical insight into the application of professional communication to everyday life, learning how to persuade and influence others effectively. Improving your listening and communication skills is advantageous for both your personal and your professional life.

This workshop is led by Richard Mullender, an external trainer who formerly worked for the Metropolitan Police as a hostage negotiator, and then as Lead Trainer at the National Crisis & Hostage Negotiation Unit in Scotland Yard. By looking at everyday scenarios as well as life-or-death negotiations from his professional experience – e.g. with terrorists for the release of hostages or with someone threatening to commit suicide – Richard demonstrates how to listen for ‘levers’ that help you to persuade and influence, and to secure the best possible outcome.

Outcomes:

  • Be able to use communication consciously to persuade and influence effectively
  • Recognize when others are using persuasive communication techniques
  • Feel more confident in presenting yourself well to others and in gaining support

2 other events...

Date Availability
Tue 3 Mar 2020 09:00 [Full]
Wed 17 Jun 2020 09:00 [Places]
The Art of Negotiation and Influence (GSLS) Tue 9 Jul 2019   09:00 Finished

A one day master class in communication from an external trainer who has previously been employed as a hostage negotiator and detective in the Metropolitan Police Force. Participants will gain a practical insight into how professional communicators communicate, and how it can be applied in everyday life.

At the end of the session participants will:

  • Know how to persuade and influence effectively
  • Understand how to have greater impact when communicating
  • Have practiced the fundamental tools of professional communicators

Topics:

  • Levels of communication
  • Trust
  • Stages of active listening
  • Non-judgmental language
  • Achieving win/win
  • Building rapport
  • Do's and don'ts

This workshop will cover the importance of graphic design, both in general and with reference to presentations and research posters for conferences and display.

The Brainfit Workout new Tue 29 Jan 2019   13:00 Finished

THE BRAINFIT WORKOUT (TM) is a stress reducing positivity workout using movement, music and meditation with powerful affirmations.

We know that stress is a major culprit in the onset of health problems and diseases. It's also the reason many people are unable to lose bodyfat, especially aorund the mid section. Negative thought patterns and self-talk affect the whole body chemistry so THE BRAINFIT WORKOUT (TM) helps retrain that inner voice using powerful affirmations and mantras. The organisers say "it is truly the next generation of Group Fitness class fusing beautifully mind, body and spirit".

If you battle negative self-talk, suffer from psychological or physical stress, need to lower the fat storing and stress hormone Cortisol, want a softer approach to fitness, want a holistic approach to health and fitness, enjoy having fun in a group exercise class, you may benefit from this class.

The Diversifying Nature of Impact Wed 18 Apr 2018   10:30 Finished

The diversifying nature of impact

Pep Pàmies, the Chief Editor of Nature Biomedical Engineering, will provide tips on how to convey your research for broader impact, and discuss the jobs that selective scientific journals need to increasingly take on.

Refreshments, including a sandwich lunch, will be provided. Please arrive promptly for a 10:30am start.

This short course covers the what, why and how of public engagement and communication. The course is for research staff and PhD students who want to gain the skills and confidence required to plan and deliver an impactful public engagement project.

2 other events...

Date Availability
Fri 29 Nov 2019 10:00 [Places]
Tue 4 Feb 2020 10:00 [Places]

This short course covers the what, why and how of public engagement and communication. The course is for research staff and PhD students who want to gain the skills and confidence required to plan and deliver an impactful public engagement project.

Ever wanted to bring comedy into your public engagement projects? This is for you, as trainer Steve Cross helps researchers to improve their communication skills, build confidence and find creative ways of communicating their research.

Ever wanted to bring comedy into your public engagement projects? This is for you, as trainer Steve Cross helps researchers to improve their communication skills, build confidence and find creative ways of communicating their research.

The Engaged Researcher: Editing your Research Video new Fri 22 Nov 2019   09:30 [Places]

Shot your research video? Got lots of video clips, photographs & audio you want to bring together to make one research video to share with public audiences around the World? Attendees on this course will learn how to cut, add soundtracks and do audio-mixing to edit their very own research video.

The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video new Tue 20 Nov 2018   09:30 Finished

Shot your research video? Got lots of video clips, photographs & audio you want to bring together to make one research video to share with public audiences around the World? Attendees on this course will learn how to cut, add soundtracks and do audio-mixing to edit their very own research video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Shooting Your Research Video session.

Successful engagement with the public can benefit research, researchers and the public – but how do you go about demonstrating this change? Evaluation of engagement doesn’t just help us demonstrate the value of our PE initiatives but can help bring us closer to our audiences by giving the public a strong clear voice. This workshop will guide you through the best evaluation processes showing you When, Why and crucially How to use evaluation to give you reliable and clear data. Demonstrate success to funders; record Impact for REF; learn how to improve your processes and have a better understanding of the people you are connecting with. This course is going to be run by Jamie Galagher: Jamie is an award-winning freelance science communicator and engagement professional. He has delivered training around the world, from skyscrapers of Hong Kong to tents in the African bush. Having had four years’ experience as the central PE lead for the University of Glasgow he has worked on improving the reach, profile and impact of research engagement in almost every academic discipline. Specialising in evaluation Jamie provides consultancy services to charities and universities helping them to demonstrate their impact and understand their audiences and stakeholders. Jamie is also an associate editor of the Research for All journal. He was named as one of the “100 leading practising scientists in the UK” by the Science Council and as one of the “175 Faces of Chemistry” by the Royal Society of Chemistry. He won the International 3 Minute Thesis Competition and Famelab Scotland. www.jamiebgall.co.uk @jamiebgall

The Engaged Researcher: Finding Your Research Story new Mon 28 Oct 2019   09:30 [Places]

We all love a good story- whether it’s the latest bestselling fiction book or a cheesy soap. And science is full of stories- stories of discovery, of persistence, of hope. Finding these stories can help take your public engagement to the next level, whatever medium you use to communicate.

The Engaged Researcher: Finding Your Research Story new Tue 22 Jan 2019   09:30 Finished

We all love a good story- whether it’s the latest bestselling fiction book or a cheesy soap. And science is full of stories- stories of discovery, of persistence, of hope. Finding these stories can help take your public engagement to the next level, whatever medium you use to communicate.

This workshop introduces how to design an effective impact evaluation.

This short course covers the what, why and how of public engagement and communication. The course is for research staff and PhD students who want to gain the skills and confidence required to plan and deliver an impactful public engagement project.

This course will cover how to use Social Media tools for Public Engagement. The course will be delivered by the Social Media and AV team.

The Engaged Researcher: Media training new Fri 8 Nov 2019   10:00   [More dates...] [Places]

This course gives an introduction into how to engage with the public through media. It will cover the differing types of media, what makes research newsworthy, how to work with the communications office to gain media coverage, what to expect from an interview (print, pre-recorded, live) and how to communicate well in interviews. It will be delivered jointly with the University Communications team

1 other event...

Date Availability
Tue 21 Jan 2020 10:00 [Places]
The Engaged Researcher: Media training new Fri 7 Jun 2019   10:00 Finished

This course gives an introduction into how to engage with the public through media. It will cover the differing types of media, what makes research newsworthy, how to work with the communications office to gain media coverage, what to expect from an interview (print, pre-recorded, live) and how to communicate well in interviews

What is in Impact? This course is going to disentangle academic and non-academic impact. It will explore the current research environment and impact agenda and help you understand how research is funded. You will get to discuss your research in small groups, and think about the types of impact it could generate. You will also understand where Public Engagement sits in the wider Impact agenda. You will have the opportunity to analyse impact cases studies that featured Public Engagement as a pathway to Impact.

The Engaged Researcher: Public Engagement Seminar new Tue 5 Feb 2019   12:30 Finished

Come to this Public Engagement Seminar to hear about an inspirational patient and public involvement (PPI) project from one of your colleagues in the University, Dr Anna Spathis. The PPI project won a prize at the 2018 Vice-Chancellor's public engagement with research awards.

This is also an opportunity to network with others interested in Public Engagement and to talk to a member of the Public Engagement Team.

Why not bring your lunch with you?

This 2 hour workshop will discuss "why does research matter and how do we share it?"

This workshop provides top tips and guidance on developing an impact evaluation survey that is robust. This will include helping participants identify and avoid common pitfalls in impact evaluation questionnaire design, as well as accounting for key issues such as representative sampling. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop their own survey questions with feedback and support during the workshop.

The Engaged Researcher: Research Video: Social Media new Tue 26 Feb 2019   09:30 Finished

Everyone is watching video on Social Media these days. So it is a great place to share your research. Learn about the best ways to create & upload video for, as well as go live on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram. You just need yourself, a smartphone and your enthusiasm!

The Engaged Researcher: Shooting Your Research Video new Tue 13 Nov 2018   09:30 Finished

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A video is a great way to spread the message of your research to different public audiences across the World! Attendees will be equipped with the skills needed to plan and shoot high quality footage for your very own research-video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video session.

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A video is a great way to spread the message of your research to different public audiences across the World! Attendees will be equipped with the skills needed to plan and shoot high quality footage for your very own research-video.

It is strongly recommended that you also attend The Engaged Researcher: Editing Your Research Video session.

The Engaged Researcher: Telling Your Research Story new Wed 6 Nov 2019   09:30 [Places]

Whether at a conference, a science festival or in the pub, all scientists need to be able to talk about their work in an engaging and understandable way. This practical, hands-on session will help scientists develop their communication skills, so they are confident talking to diverse audiences in a range of environments.

The Engaged Researcher: Telling Your Research Story new Tue 30 Apr 2019   09:30 Finished

Whether at a conference, a science festival or in the pub, all scientists need to be able to talk about their work in an engaging and understandable way. This practical, hands-on session will help scientists develop their communication skills, so they are confident talking to diverse audiences in a range of environments.

Stories weave together fact and emotion, helping people to understand the world. They can also be a powerful tool for you to share your research with the public.

This whole day workshop run by the internationally acclaimed Story Collider, will help you to understand how narrative can enrich your science engagement. Through a combination of creative techniques and empirical science, you will brainstorm, develop and refine your own research stories.

The Engaged Researcher: Working with Museums new Wed 27 Nov 2019   10:00 [Places]

Museums and collections are so much more than the objects they house. They are places of research, education and engagement, and they are open to members of the public in ways that departments and colleges are not. They can allow researchers to reach a range of diverse audiences. This training session will give you an insight into the breadth of activity ongoing at University of Cambridge Museums and how it could relate to your research and public engagement plans. After this training you will have a better understanding of the opportunities to work with museums.

« Description not available »

You’ve heard of it but what’s all the fuss about?

Since it was announced in September 2018 there has been a great deal of coverage around Plan S – the new initiative for Open Access publishing. The plan calls for all scientific publications resulting from grants funded by public research to be made available on compliant journals or platforms. This decision has drawn both praise and alarm from the research community but what does it all mean?

This webinar will discuss the history of Plan S, the principles that make up the plan and the arguments both in favour and against.

Letters have been for centuries the main form of communication between scientists. Correspondence collections are a unique window into the social networks of prominent historical figures. What can digital social sciences and humanities reveal about the correspondence networks of 19th century scientists? This two-session intensive workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore possible answers to this question.

With the digitisation and encoding of personal letters, researchers have at their disposal a wealth of relational data, which we propose to study through social network analysis (SNA). The workshop will be divided in two sessions during which participants will “learn by doing” how to apply SNA to personal correspondence datasets. Following a guided project framework, participants will work on the correspondence collections of John Herschel and Charles Darwin. After a contextual introduction to the datasets, the sessions will focus on the basic concepts of SNA, data transformation and preparation, data visualisation and data analysis, with particular emphasis on “ego network” measures.

The two demonstration datasets used during the workshop will be provided by the Epsilon project, a research consortium between Cambridge Digital Library, The Royal Institution and The Royal Society of London aimed at building a collaborative digital framework for 19th century letters of science. The first dataset, the “Calendar of the Correspondence of Sir John Hershel Database at the Adler Planetarium”, is a collection of the personal correspondence of John Frederick William Herschel (1792-1871), a polymath celebrated for his contributions to the field of astronomy. Its curation process started in the 50s at the Royal Society and currently comprises 14.815 digitised letters encoded in extensible markup language (.xml) format. The second dataset, the “Darwin Correspondence Project” has been locating, researching, editing and publishing Charles Darwin’s letters since 1974. In addition to a 30-volume print edition, the project has also made letters available in .xml format.

The workshop will provide a step-by-step guide to analysing correspondence networks from these collections, which will cover:

- Explanation of the encoding procedures and rationale following the Text Encoding Initiative guidelines; - Preparation and transformation of .xml files for analysis with an open source data wrangler; - Rendering of network visualisations using an open source SNA tool; - Analysis of the Ego Networks of John Herschel and Charles Darwin (requires UCINET)

About the speakers and course facilitators:

Anne Alexander is Director of Learning at Cambridge Digital Humanities

Hugo Leal is Methods Fellow at Cambridge Digital Humanities and Co-ordinator of the Cambridge Data School

Louisiane Ferlier is Digital Resources Manager at the Centre for the History of Science at the Royal Society. In her current role she facilitates research collaborations with the Royal Society collections, curates digital and physical exhibitions, as well as augmenting its portfolio of digital assets. A historian of ideas by training, her research investigates the material and intellectual circulation of ideas in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Elizabeth Smith is the Associate Editor for Digital Development at the Darwin Correspondence Project, where she contributed to the conversion of the Project’s work into TEI several years ago, and has since been collaborating with the technical director in enhancing the Darwin Project’s data. She is one of the co-ordinators of Epsilon, a TEI-based portal for nineteenth-century science letters.

No knowledge of prior knowledge of programming is required, instructions on software to install will be sent out before the workshop. Some exercises and preparation for the second session will be set during the first and participants should allow 2-3 hours for this. Please note, priority will be given to staff and students at the University of Cambridge for booking onto this workshop.

CDH Learning gratefully acknowledges the support of the Isaac Newton Trust and the Faculty of History for this workshop.

The Library as Data new Mon 15 Oct 2018   13:30 Finished

Discover the rich digital collections of Cambridge University Library and explore the methods and tools that researchers are using to analyse and visualise data.

The Library as Data: An overview new Wed 16 Oct 2019   11:00 Finished

Is the "digital library" more than a virtual rendering of the bookshelf or filing cabinet? Does the transformation of books into bytes and manuscripts into pixels change the way we create and share knowledge? This session introduces a conceptual toolkit for understanding the library collection in the digital age, and provides a guide to key methods for accessing, transforming and analysing the contents as data. Using the rich collections of Cambridge University Library as a starting point, we will explore:

  • Relations between digital and material texts and artefacts
  • Definitions of data and metadata
  • Methods for accessing data in bulk from digital collections
  • Understanding file formats and standards

The session will also provide an overview of the content in the rest of the term’s Library as Data programme, and introduce our annual call for applications to the Machine Reading the Archive Projects mentoring scheme.

The Library as Data: Digital Text Markup and TEI new Wed 23 Oct 2019   11:00 [Places]

Text encoding, or the addition of semantic meaning to text, is a core activity in digital humanities, covering everything from linguistic analysis of novels to quantitative research on manuscript collections. In this session we will take a look at the fundamentals of text encoding – why we might want to do it, and why we need to think carefully about our approaches. We will also introduce the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative), the most commonly used standard for markup in the digital humanities, and look at some common research applications through examples.

Recent advances in machine learning are allowing computer vision and humanities researchers to develop new tools and methods for exploring digital image collections. Neural network models are now able to match, differentiate and classify images at scale in ways which would have been impossible a few years ago. This session introduces the IIIF image data framework, which has been developed by a consortium of the world’s leading research libraries and image repositories, and demonstrates a range of different machine learning- based methods for exploring digital image collections. We will also discuss some of the ethical challenges of applying computer vision algorithms to cultural and historical image collections. Topics covered will include:

  • Unlocking image collections with the IIIF image data framework
  • Machine Learning: a very short introduction
  • Working with images at scale: ethical and methodological challenges
  • Applying computer vision methods to digital collections

This session focusses on providing photography skills for those undertaking archival research. Dr Oliver Dunn has experience spanning a decade filming documents for major academic research projects. He will go over practical approaches to finding and ordering materials in the archive, methods of handling and filming them, digital file storage, and transcription strategies. The focus is very much on low-tech approaches and small budgets. We’ll consider best uses of smartphones, digital cameras and tripods. The session is held in the IT training room at the University Library.

Correspondence collections are a unique window into the social networks of prominent historical figures. With the digitisation and encoding of personal letters, researchers have at their disposal a wealth of relational data, which can be studied using social network analysis.

This session will introduce and demonstrate foundational concepts, methods and tools in social network analysis using datasets prepared from the Darwin Correspondence collection. Topics covered will include

  • Explanation of the encoding procedures and rationale following the Text Encoding Initiative guidelines
  • Preparation and transformation of .xml files for analysis with an open source data wrangler
  • Rendering of network visualisations using an open source SNA tool

No knowledge of prior knowledge of programming is required, instructions on software to install will be sent out before the session

The Old Schools: Fire Warden Training Mon 16 Jul 2012   10:15 Finished

Fire Warden training will give clear instruction of the roles of designated fire wardens and assist fire safety managers to comply with current fire safety legislation. Use of Fire Extinguisher training provides hands on experience in the correct use of portable fire extinguishers.

For World Digital Preservation Day, come and celebrate the thinking and work required for the long-term preservation of our collections.

Hear about the challenges of audiovisual content (including both digital and analogue), in relation to Cambridge University Libraries audiovisual collections. Find out about why there is a ‘deadline’ for audiovisual content, and what might be done about it.

Learn about why we're at a crossroads in regard to digital preservation and where we might go from here.

Two short talks by Somaya Langley and Dave Gerrard of the Polonsky-funded Digital Preservation at Oxford and Cambridge (DPOC) project. Plus an opportunity for Q&A and discussion of audiovisual and digital preservation challenges.

The Prevent Duty: A Briefing for All Staff Thu 28 Nov 2019   10:00   [More dates...] [Places]

The University has a statutory duty to have ‘due regard to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism’. This is known as the Prevent Duty (Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015). It is primarily about safeguarding students and staff in the University and includes a range of responsibilities in areas such as pastoral care, support for staff and students, procedures for arranging events and using facilities. All staff need to be aware of the process of radicalisation, definitions of extremism and the process for raising concerns in this context.

This short session provides information about Prevent for all staff working in in the University. It includes input and examples to consider and combines the content in Module 1 – An introduction to the Prevent Duty: Online and the University Prevent website.

You can access these as an alternative to attending this session.

Full details of available training and support are on the Prevent Training Moodle site using your Raven login.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Tue 17 Mar 2020 10:00 [Places]
[Back to top]