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SSRMC Training Programme 2019-20

Programme of events provided by Social Sciences Research Methods Programme
(Wed 9 Oct 2019 - Wed 8 Apr 2020)

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Wed 30 Oct 2019 – Mon 11 Nov 2019

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Wednesday 30 October 2019

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

13:30
Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis (1 of 2) Finished 13:30 - 15:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

The focus of these two sessions will be the linking of theory to method, paying particular attention to the relationship between language or other forms of representation or communication and the broader social milieu with special attention to power relations. The topic will be approached from a broadly Foucauldian angle: Foucault writes that discourse “consists of not—of no longer—treating discourses as groups of signs signifying elements referring to contents of representations, but as practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak.” The emphasis of these two lectures will be less upon what is known as ‘conversation analysis’ or ‘content analysis’ and more on methods based on post-positivist methods and critical theory which emphasize how language and other social practices create reality rather than reflect it, and thus methods of interpreting discourse are themselves not ideologically or politically neutral practices.

Session 1: The origins of critical discourse analysis (the Frankfurt school, Foucault, post-structuralism, feminism); how theoretical backgrounds shape research design
Session 2: 'Doing' discourse analysis: analysing methods and approaches

14:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

16:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (2 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Monday 4 November 2019

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata.

You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

14:00
Diary Methodology (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This four-part workshop series provides an introduction to using solicited diaries as a research tool. The main goal of the course is to add diary methodology to students’ research toolboxes. It is a flexible and versatile tool that has been used by researchers in many fields, including public health, nursing, psychology, media studies, education, and sociology. The workshop is suitable for anybody interested in learning more about the method and/or using diaries in their research.

The course covers the use of qualitative and quantitative types of diaries, both as a self-standing tool and as a part of mixed-method research designs. The lectures and workshops aim to provide theoretical and practical foundations, as well as first-hand experience with solicited diaries as a research tool. The course also provides unique insights into diary data analysis and its challenges.

The course is equally driven by lectures and student participation/practicums. The initial workshop (Week 1) provides a solid theoretical introduction to the diary methodology, including the history of the method, qualitative and quantitative variants, modes of delivery, and use of technology. The follow-up workshops sequentially advance this knowledge base through practical exercises and discussions (Weeks 2 & 4), as well as a specialist lecture (Week 3) on data management, participant communication, ethics and data analysis.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-1) (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata.

You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

16:00
Reading and Understanding Statistics (2 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for students who don’t plan to use quantitative methods in their own research, but who need to be able to read and understand published research using quantitative methods. You will learn how to interpret graphs, frequency tables and multivariate regression results, and to ask intelligent questions about sampling, methods and statistical inference. The module is aimed at complete beginners, with no prior knowledge of statistics or quantitative methods.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-2) (4 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Tuesday 5 November 2019

11:00
An Overview Of Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis new (4 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Sidgwick Site, Lecture Block Room 1

With such a large variety of qualitative research methods to choose from, creating a research design can be confusing and difficult without a sufficiently informed overview. This module aims to provide an overview by introducing qualitative data collection and analysis methods commonly used in social science research. The module provides a foundation for other SSRMP qualitative methods modules such as ethnography, discourse analysis, interviews, or diary research. Knowing what is ‘out there’ will help a researcher purposefully select further modules to study on, provide readings to deepen knowledge on specific methods, and will facilitate a more informed research design that contributes to successful empirical research.

14:00
Psychometrics (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

An introduction to the design, validation and implementation of tests and questionnaires in social science research, using both Classical Test Theory (CTT) and modern psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory (IRT). This course aims to enable students to: be able to construct and validate a test or questionnaire; understand the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of existing tests and questionnaires; appreciate the impact and potential of modern psychometric methods in the internet age.

Week 1: Introduction to psychometrics
a. Psychometrics, ancient and modern. Classical Test Theory
b. How to design and build your own psychometric test

Week 2: Testing in the online environment
a. Testing via the internet. How to, plus do’s and don’ts
b. Putting your test online

Week 3: Modern Psychometrics
a. Item Response Theory (IRT) models and their assumptions
b. Advanced assessment using computer adaptive testing

Week 4: Implementing adaptive tests online
a. How to automatically generate ability items
b. Practical

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (4 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.

Wednesday 6 November 2019

10:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

13:30
Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis (2 of 2) Finished 13:30 - 15:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

The focus of these two sessions will be the linking of theory to method, paying particular attention to the relationship between language or other forms of representation or communication and the broader social milieu with special attention to power relations. The topic will be approached from a broadly Foucauldian angle: Foucault writes that discourse “consists of not—of no longer—treating discourses as groups of signs signifying elements referring to contents of representations, but as practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak.” The emphasis of these two lectures will be less upon what is known as ‘conversation analysis’ or ‘content analysis’ and more on methods based on post-positivist methods and critical theory which emphasize how language and other social practices create reality rather than reflect it, and thus methods of interpreting discourse are themselves not ideologically or politically neutral practices.

Session 1: The origins of critical discourse analysis (the Frankfurt school, Foucault, post-structuralism, feminism); how theoretical backgrounds shape research design
Session 2: 'Doing' discourse analysis: analysing methods and approaches

14:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-3) (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

16:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS-4) (4 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introductory course for students who have little or no prior training in statistics. The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to analyze real data using the statistical package Stata. You will learn:

  • The key features of quantitative analysis, and how it differs from other types of empirical analysis
  • Basic concepts: what is a variable? what is the distribution of a variable? and how can we best represent a distribution graphically?
  • Features of statistical distributions: measures of central tendency and dispersion
  • The normal distribution
  • The basics of formal hypothesis testing
  • Why statistical testing works
  • Statistical methods used to test simple hypotheses
  • How to use Stata

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Monday 11 November 2019

10:00
Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA 2) (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA-1) (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Department of Genetics, Biffen Lecture, Downing Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

14:00
Diary Methodology (3 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This four-part workshop series provides an introduction to using solicited diaries as a research tool. The main goal of the course is to add diary methodology to students’ research toolboxes. It is a flexible and versatile tool that has been used by researchers in many fields, including public health, nursing, psychology, media studies, education, and sociology. The workshop is suitable for anybody interested in learning more about the method and/or using diaries in their research.

The course covers the use of qualitative and quantitative types of diaries, both as a self-standing tool and as a part of mixed-method research designs. The lectures and workshops aim to provide theoretical and practical foundations, as well as first-hand experience with solicited diaries as a research tool. The course also provides unique insights into diary data analysis and its challenges.

The course is equally driven by lectures and student participation/practicums. The initial workshop (Week 1) provides a solid theoretical introduction to the diary methodology, including the history of the method, qualitative and quantitative variants, modes of delivery, and use of technology. The follow-up workshops sequentially advance this knowledge base through practical exercises and discussions (Weeks 2 & 4), as well as a specialist lecture (Week 3) on data management, participant communication, ethics and data analysis.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA-1) (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.

Doing Qualitative Interviews (1 of 3) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 3

Face-to-face interviews are used to collect a wide range of information in the social sciences. They are appropriate for the gathering of information on individual and institutional patterns of behaviour; complex histories or processes; identities and cultural meanings; routines that are not written down; and life-history events. Face-to-face interviews thus comprise an appropriate method to generate information on individual behaviour, the reasons for certain patterns of acting and talking, and the type of connection people have with each other.

The first session provides an overview of interviewing as a social research method, then focuses on the processes of organising and conducting qualitative interviews. The second session explores the ethics and practical constraints of interviews as a research method, particularly relevant when attempting to engage with marginalised or stigmatised communities. The third session focuses on organisation and analysis after interviews, including interpretation through coding and close reading. This session involves practical examples from qualitative analysis software. The final session provides an opportunity for a hands-on session, to which students should bring their interview material (at whatever stage of the process: whether writing interview questions, coding or analysing data) in order to receive advice and support in taking the interview material/data to the next stage of the research process.

Topics:

1. Conducting qualitative interviews

2. Ethics and practical constraints

3. Practical session: interpretation and analysis

NOTE: Strike action is taking place between 25 November and 4 December 2019. If the strike goes ahead, this module will be affected. Please see the 'latest news' section on the home page of the SSRMP website for more information.

16:00
Reading and Understanding Statistics (3 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for students who don’t plan to use quantitative methods in their own research, but who need to be able to read and understand published research using quantitative methods. You will learn how to interpret graphs, frequency tables and multivariate regression results, and to ask intelligent questions about sampling, methods and statistical inference. The module is aimed at complete beginners, with no prior knowledge of statistics or quantitative methods.

Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA 2) (2 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module follows on from Foundations in Applied statistics, and will teach you the basics of common bivariate techniques (that is, techniques that examine the associations between two variables). The module is divided between lectures, in which you'll learn the relevant theory, and hands-on practical sessions, in which you will learn how to apply these techniques to the analysis of real data.

Techniques to be covered include:

  • Cross-tabulations
  • Scatterplots
  • Covariance and correlation
  • Nonparametric methods
  • Two-sample t-tests
  • ANOVA
  • Ordinary Least Squares (OLS)

For best results, students should expect to do a few hours of private study and spend a little extra time in the computer labs, in addition to coming to class.