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Office of Scholarly Communication course timetable

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Mon 4 Dec 2017 – Thu 12 Jul

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December 2017

Mon 4
Managing your research data effectively and working reproducibly new Finished 14:00 - 16:00 Department of Geography, Downing Site

Feeling lost in getting started on data management?

Attend the workshop to get inspired and started on how to structure, backup and describe your data.

This workshop (for students in the area of physical and human geography, as well as STEM subjects generally) will work through the challenges around managing research data as well as the benefits of working reproducibly. Participants will be provided with guidance and resources on how to effectively manage projects and avoid data loss throughout the research process.

You will hear of what can happen if researchers do not manage their data well as well as what happens to research data after the end of a project, such as how to share and store data in a long-term and sustainable way. It is never too early to start thinking about these things, so get a head start on your research data management practices now!

Department of Geography, Seminar Room

Tue 5

David Carr and Robert Kiley from the Wellcome Trust are coming to Cambridge to talk with researchers about the Trust’s policy on data, software and materials management and sharing, which was released in July 2017. They will give short talks about the extended requirements for sharing all research outputs and an update on how their policy on open research has been working. Afterwards you will have the opportunity to ask them any questions you might have.

This event will be held in the Gurdon Institute tea-room.

February 2018

Thu 1
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Tue 6
The Publishing Trap (for librarians) new Finished 10:30 - 12:30 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

The creators of the hugely successful Copyright Card Game bring their new board game to Cambridge. Looking at the world of scholarly communication this interactive game aims to offer librarians a better understanding of the implications of copyright on the publication process. Players will be guided through the different stages of a researchers career from PhD submission to Professorship, making decisions on a range of scenarios. The aim of the game is to develop an understanding of how money, copyright and publishing models will impact a career.

This session offers a chance to both play the game with the creators and learn how to guide your own researchers through the game.

Thu 8

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 15

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Thu 22
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Tue 27
The Publishing Trap (for PhD students and researchers) new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 11

The Publishing Trap is a board game designed to introduce researchers to scholarly publishing. Looking at the world of scholarly communication, this interactive game aims to offer researchers a better understanding of the implications of copyright on the publication process. Players will be guided through the different stages of a researcher career from PhD submission to Professorship, making decisions on a range of scenarios. The aim of the game is to develop an understanding of how money, copyright and publishing models will impact an academic career.

Learn more about the game here: https://copyrightliteracy.org/resources/the-publishing-trap/

The Publishing Trap was designed by Dr Jane Secker and Chris Morrison (UK Copyright Literacy) and is used under a CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

March 2018

Thu 1
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Thu 8

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Software Licensing Workshop new Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute, Seminar Theatre 001

Have you produced your own software? Did you know you can decide how others can reuse and share it? Do you know that there are a range of licences that you could apply to your work that determine how it can be used?

This workshop will explore why you should licence your software clearly and how to do so. A range of different licences will be explained as well as tools that can help you decide. Join the Research Data Management Facility and Neil Chue Hong from the Software Sustainability Institute to talk in detail about software licences.

Tue 13
Managing Data Management: Getting Started with Data Management Plan Support new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Librarians are used to dealing with data in all its forms but sometimes researchers aren't so sure. Many funders now require evidence from the researcher of how they plan to manage the data they use and collect during the research process and this often has to be tailored to specific guidelines. This presents a great opportunity for library staff to work with the research community but how do they get started?

Join the OSC to learn more about what a data management plan is, why they are necessary, the different information needed, how to complete one and how to support someone in completing theirs. This interactive train-the-trainer workshop will include a mix of presentations and activities with a chance to put your new knowledge into practice.

Mon 19
Easter App Hunt: Twitter for Librarians new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, Training Room

Are you completely new to Twitter and struggling to start? Or are you already on Twitter but know you could be making better use of it to promote yourself and your library? Join Librarians In Training for an interactive workshop aimed at helping librarians to make the most of their time online.

Offered as part of the Librarians In Training Easter App Hunt this interactive session will give you the chance to enhance your Twitter skills. For those new to the platform there will be guidance on what Twitter can be used for and how to get started whilst those already using Twitter will benefit from learning how to engage library users, promote their service and enhance their own professional network.

The session will include both advice and practical exercises so you can put your new knowledge to the test.

Tue 20
Dimensions: A New Research Analysis Tool new Finished 15:00 - 17:00 Cambridge University Library, Training Room

You know about Symplectic Elements as a way to gather the outputs of our research community but have you ever wanted to know more about the connections between funding and publications?

Digital Science, the makers of Symplectic Elements, have recently launched a new product called Dimensions. Dimensions integrates with Elements to link grants, publications, citations, clinical trials and patents and enables us to take a completely different view of what our research community is doing.

Join Dr Juergen Wastl from the Research Information Office for a demonstration of how the institutional instance of Dimensions works, ask any questions and get some hands on experience with the system.

For a sneak preview, the publication instance of Dimensions is available to all here.

April 2018

Thu 12
Text and Data Mining: One Year On new Finished 14:00 - 16:00 Todd-Hamied

In February 2017, about 30 library staff met to discuss what University of Cambridge libraries could offer in the way of Text and Data Mining Services. Since then, various initiatives, discussions and events to move this issue forward have taken place. In this meeting a summary of the last year's activities, with particular emphasis on the main outcomes, will be presented, there will be an update on some initiatives currently in progress and there will be an opportunity to discuss the way ahead.

The session will take place at the Department of Chemistry in the Todd-Hamied Meeting Room.

May 2018

Thu 3
Open Access Update 2018 (Webinar for librarians) new Finished 12:30 - 13:30 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

What's new in Open Access for 2018?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find the time to keep up. This webinar on Open Access offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

Wed 9
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Wed 16

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Mon 21
Research Data Management Recap (for librarians) new Finished 11:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Are you new to research data management or in need of a refresher? Join the OSC for a recap of all things RDM in an accessible one hour workshop.

This session will feature a whistle stop tour through the dos and don'ts of RDM in order to give attendees a brief overview of some of the major issues.

This session is being offered in conjunction with the new course Managing Data Management: Getting Started with Data Management Plan Support. The courses may be taken separately or as a pair to suit the needs of the individual learner.

Wed 23

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Wed 30
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review

June 2018

Wed 6
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Thu 7
Managing Data Management: Getting Started with Data Management Plan Support (for librarians) new Finished 14:30 - 16:30 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

Librarians are used to dealing with data in all its forms but sometimes researchers aren't so sure. Many funders now require evidence from the researcher of how they plan to manage the data they use and collect during the research process and this often has to be tailored to specific guidelines. This presents a great opportunity for library staff to work with the research community but how do they get started?

Join the OSC to learn more about what a data management plan is, why they are necessary, the different information needed, how to complete one and how to support someone in completing theirs. This interactive train-the-trainer workshop will include a mix of presentations and activities with a chance to put your new knowledge into practice.

Wed 13

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

July 2018

Thu 12
How to help researchers navigate Open Access requirements (for librarians and administrators) new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, Training Room

Are the researchers in your department confused about what they need to do about Open Access?

This support session will equip you to help them understand:

  • what Open Access policies actually mean for researchers across the disciplines
  • what they are required to do in order for their research to be eligible for REF 2021

Dr Arthur Smith of the Office of Scholarly Communication will discuss everything you need to know to guide researchers through the process of making research Open Access, and will demonstrate how to manage key tasks in Symplectic Elements.