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Researcher Development Programme (RDP)

Researcher Development Programme (RDP) course timetable

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Sun 1 Aug – Fri 29 Oct

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September 2021

Tue 28
Engaged Researcher Online - Working With Schools (1 of 2) [Full] 13:00 - 14:30 Online

Engaging young people with your research can be very worthwhile and rewarding. This training session will support you with your public engagement work with schools by introducing you to the UK school system and discussing how public engagement work can fit with existing school priorities. We will consider ways in which your work can make an impact and briefly consider how public engagement can work with underrepresented groups and contribute to diversity and inclusion initiatives. You’ll be introduced to ways in which the University already works with schools to provide you with ideas for collaboration. Lastly, we’ll begin to think about how to plan and design activities suitable for school audiences.

At the end of this session, you’ll hopefully feel more confident about how to work effectively with schools and can start thinking about your own public engagement work. The group session will be followed by the opportunity for a one-to-one 15-minute session with the trainer where you can discuss your projects, ideas and questions and get project specific help.

This course will be led by Michelle Tang. Michelle currently works as the Deputy Head of Widening Participation for the University (within the Cambridge Admissions Office). In her role, she oversees a team who work with over 200 schools and 5000 school-aged students each year in a number of widening participation programmes including the University’s flagship HE+ programme, the Sutton Trust Summer Schools and the Insight programme. She has also previously worked as a Schools Liaison Officer, travelling and visiting schools all over the UK but particularly in Yorkshire, Berkshire and Scotland. Michelle completed the Teach First Leadership Development Programme in 2016, during which she worked as a primary school teacher in north London, and holds a PGCE from the Institute of Education. She is passionate about social mobility and the transformative power of education in closing equality gaps.

October 2021

Fri 1
Engaged Researcher Online - Working With Schools (2 of 2) [Full] 10:00 - 12:00 Online

Engaging young people with your research can be very worthwhile and rewarding. This training session will support you with your public engagement work with schools by introducing you to the UK school system and discussing how public engagement work can fit with existing school priorities. We will consider ways in which your work can make an impact and briefly consider how public engagement can work with underrepresented groups and contribute to diversity and inclusion initiatives. You’ll be introduced to ways in which the University already works with schools to provide you with ideas for collaboration. Lastly, we’ll begin to think about how to plan and design activities suitable for school audiences.

At the end of this session, you’ll hopefully feel more confident about how to work effectively with schools and can start thinking about your own public engagement work. The group session will be followed by the opportunity for a one-to-one 15-minute session with the trainer where you can discuss your projects, ideas and questions and get project specific help.

This course will be led by Michelle Tang. Michelle currently works as the Deputy Head of Widening Participation for the University (within the Cambridge Admissions Office). In her role, she oversees a team who work with over 200 schools and 5000 school-aged students each year in a number of widening participation programmes including the University’s flagship HE+ programme, the Sutton Trust Summer Schools and the Insight programme. She has also previously worked as a Schools Liaison Officer, travelling and visiting schools all over the UK but particularly in Yorkshire, Berkshire and Scotland. Michelle completed the Teach First Leadership Development Programme in 2016, during which she worked as a primary school teacher in north London, and holds a PGCE from the Institute of Education. She is passionate about social mobility and the transformative power of education in closing equality gaps.

Wed 6

Are you curious to learn more about how to present your work and yourself professionally outside of academia by taking advantage of the online available resources? This training will focus on professional ‘branding’ outside of academia. First, it will introduce the importance of presenting yourself and your ideas in the right way to the stakeholders you are interested in connecting with professionally. The session will then delve into how to present your skills and your experience to position yourself credibly in a relevant field, whether on LinkedIn, through your CV and bio, or by ‘online’ networking.

The training will be led by Dr Maja Spanu. Maja is an Affiliated Lecturer in International Politics at the University of Cambridge. She has extensive international experience working in research & analysis and training & teaching in higher education, policy and cultural philanthropy. Working with universities and research institutions across Europe, she regularly delivers career trainings & advice to researchers and university staff seeking to professionalise outside of academia, make their work policy-relevant or enhance their social impact in meaningful and creative ways.

Fri 8

Everyone who works with children has a responsibility for keeping them safe. This safeguarding training has been designed specifically to support researchers who may be new to working with children and schools. In this introductory session, we will understand what safeguarding and child protection means and what it involves, discuss potential signs that a young person might be being abused and what to do if you have a safeguarding concern. We will look at some general good practice as well as how to plan events and sessions with safeguarding in mind.

This course will be led by Michelle Tang. Michelle currently works as the Deputy Head of Widening Participation for the University (within the Cambridge Admissions Office). In her role, she oversees a team who work with over 200 schools and 5000 school-aged students each year in a number of widening participation programmes including the University’s flagship HE+ programme, the Sutton Trust Summer Schools and the Insight programme. She has also previously worked as a Schools Liaison Officer, travelling and visiting schools all over the UK but particularly in Yorkshire, Berkshire and Scotland. Michelle completed the Teach First Leadership Development Programme in 2016, during which she worked as a primary school teacher in north London, and holds a PGCE from the Institute of Education. She is passionate about social mobility and the transformative power of education in closing equality gaps.

Mon 11

Capturing your audience’s attention and keeping it is vital for any type of public engagement. Having a good story to tell and then telling it in a compelling way enables you to connect with a wide audience. This theory session takes you through the art and science of storytelling: exploring attention and motivation, dramatic structure, rhetorical devices, visual enhancements, and peripheral influences so that you can craft your own engaging story.

The course will be led by Sarah Cruise. Sarah is passionate about the art and science of communication and eloquential is her rattle bag of knowledge, skills and experience which she uses to train, coach and facilitate. Sarah collects research from areas such as psychology and neuroscience, along with practitioners experience from the performing arts to fill her bag of tricks, tips and advice. Sarah has been involved in public engagement training since 2006, working closely with Cambridge University. She is also a peripatetic teacher of communication and performance skills in schools and a co-presenter on the Gin & Topic podcast.

Wed 13

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

Thu 14

This course gives an introduction for researchers working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Clinical subjects into how to engage with the public through media. It will cover the differing types of media, what makes research newsworthy, how to work with the communications office to gain media coverage, what to expect from an interview (print, pre-recorded, live) and how to communicate well in interviews. It will be delivered by the University Communications team.

Fri 15

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

Tue 19
Engaged Researcher Online - Research Storytelling Masterclass new (1 of 3) [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 Online

Practical extension of the Research Storytelling theory session to put knowledge into practice with your own research. This includes individual coaching, peer mentoring sessions, and a final showcase session which also looks at the next steps to take these stories further. Attendees must have already attended the Research Storytelling Introduction session or the Research Storytelling course delivered in the past years. 20-min one-to-one sessions with the trainer on 20 or 21 October must be booked directly with the trainer.

The course will be led by Sarah Cruise. Sarah is passionate about the art and science of communication and eloquential is her rattle bag of knowledge, skills and experience which she uses to train, coach and facilitate. Sarah collects research from areas such as psychology and neuroscience, along with practitioners experience from the performing arts to fill her bag of tricks, tips and advice. Sarah has been involved in public engagement training since 2006, working closely with Cambridge University. She is also a peripatetic teacher of communication and performance skills in schools and a co-presenter on the Gin & Topic podcast.

Wed 20
Engaged Researcher Online - Research Storytelling Masterclass new (2 of 3) [Places] 00:00 - 00:00 Online

Practical extension of the Research Storytelling theory session to put knowledge into practice with your own research. This includes individual coaching, peer mentoring sessions, and a final showcase session which also looks at the next steps to take these stories further. Attendees must have already attended the Research Storytelling Introduction session or the Research Storytelling course delivered in the past years. 20-min one-to-one sessions with the trainer on 20 or 21 October must be booked directly with the trainer.

The course will be led by Sarah Cruise. Sarah is passionate about the art and science of communication and eloquential is her rattle bag of knowledge, skills and experience which she uses to train, coach and facilitate. Sarah collects research from areas such as psychology and neuroscience, along with practitioners experience from the performing arts to fill her bag of tricks, tips and advice. Sarah has been involved in public engagement training since 2006, working closely with Cambridge University. She is also a peripatetic teacher of communication and performance skills in schools and a co-presenter on the Gin & Topic podcast.

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project.

Topics:

  • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals?
  • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders
  • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

This course will be led by Dr Lucy Spokes, the Head of Public Engagement. The group session will be followed by the opportunity for a one-to-one 15-minute session where you can discuss your projects, ideas and questions and get project specific help. This individual optional session can be booked either with Lucy or with Dr Selen Etingu-Breslaw, the Public Engagement and Impact Manager (Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Technology).

Thu 21

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project.

Topics:

  • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals?
  • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders
  • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

This course will be led by Dr Lucy Spokes, the Head of Public Engagement. The group session will be followed by the opportunity for a one-to-one 15-minute session where you can discuss your projects, ideas and questions and get project specific help. This individual optional session can be booked either with Lucy or with Dr Selen Etingu-Breslaw, the Public Engagement and Impact Manager (Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Technology).

Fri 22

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

We’ll be looking at the what, why and how of public engagement and introducing researchers to some of the ways to plan an effective public engagement project.

Topics:

  • The what: definitions of public engagement, who are the public, what activities count as engagement, what are the goals?
  • The why: University commitment to PE, REF, Funders
  • The how: the Logic Model approach to planning PE, practical considerations, moving engagement online and opportunities at the University.

This course will be led by Dr Lucy Spokes, the Head of Public Engagement. The group session will be followed by the opportunity for a one-to-one 15-minute session where you can discuss your projects, ideas and questions and get project specific help. This individual optional session can be booked either with Lucy or with Dr Selen Etingu-Breslaw, the Public Engagement and Impact Manager (Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, Physical Sciences and Technology).

Engaged Researcher Online - Research Storytelling Masterclass new (3 of 3) [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 Online

Practical extension of the Research Storytelling theory session to put knowledge into practice with your own research. This includes individual coaching, peer mentoring sessions, and a final showcase session which also looks at the next steps to take these stories further. Attendees must have already attended the Research Storytelling Introduction session or the Research Storytelling course delivered in the past years. 20-min one-to-one sessions with the trainer on 20 or 21 October must be booked directly with the trainer.

The course will be led by Sarah Cruise. Sarah is passionate about the art and science of communication and eloquential is her rattle bag of knowledge, skills and experience which she uses to train, coach and facilitate. Sarah collects research from areas such as psychology and neuroscience, along with practitioners experience from the performing arts to fill her bag of tricks, tips and advice. Sarah has been involved in public engagement training since 2006, working closely with Cambridge University. She is also a peripatetic teacher of communication and performance skills in schools and a co-presenter on the Gin & Topic podcast.

Mon 25
Engaged Researcher Online - Creative Writing (1 of 2) [Full] 10:00 - 11:45 Online

Have you ever wanted to get creative with your research – to discover how writing can bring a new perspective to your research? How your words can engage with new audiences about the academic research that you are passionate about?

This training will enable you to develop creative ways by which you can engage with the public, providing you with the resources to be more confident in developing, and sharing, creative writing responses to your area of research.

The course will introduce creative writing for poetry and prose, and textual writing for exhibition / display. It will discuss developing writing for performance and for publication and work with you to bring out the creative responses that lay within your own work. There will be the opportunity to receive written feedback throughout the week, to share your work at a final showcase, and to discuss your work in a 1-to-1 session with the course tutor (if requested in advance).

The training will be led by David Cain. David’s most recent book, Truth Street, was shortlisted for the prestigious Forward Prizes for Poetry (2019). David brings his writing experience together with a passion for public engagement - he currently leads the delivery of the Cambridge Festival.

Tue 26

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

Wed 27

Why is YouTube popular? Because people love watching videos. A research video can be a great way to get your message across to your collaborators, your friends, and the wider world as well as being a condition of some funding bodies.

But it isn't easy to do well - and this is where this course will make a difference. Come along and learn the skills needed to plan, shoot & edit high quality footage for research videos so that your video can stand out from the crowd. You just need yourself, a camera phone and your enthusiasm!

The course will be led by Ryd Cook. Ryd is a multi award winning film director, actor and mentor. His fiction and documentary films have screened in film festivals around the world. He has 15+ years of experience, filming, editing and producing a range of films. He has also been teaching practical filmmaking for over 10 years for all ages. He currently works as a director, cameraperson, actor and mentor.

Fri 29
Engaged Researcher Online - Creative Writing (2 of 2) [Full] 10:00 - 11:45 Online

Have you ever wanted to get creative with your research – to discover how writing can bring a new perspective to your research? How your words can engage with new audiences about the academic research that you are passionate about?

This training will enable you to develop creative ways by which you can engage with the public, providing you with the resources to be more confident in developing, and sharing, creative writing responses to your area of research.

The course will introduce creative writing for poetry and prose, and textual writing for exhibition / display. It will discuss developing writing for performance and for publication and work with you to bring out the creative responses that lay within your own work. There will be the opportunity to receive written feedback throughout the week, to share your work at a final showcase, and to discuss your work in a 1-to-1 session with the course tutor (if requested in advance).

The training will be led by David Cain. David’s most recent book, Truth Street, was shortlisted for the prestigious Forward Prizes for Poetry (2019). David brings his writing experience together with a passion for public engagement - he currently leads the delivery of the Cambridge Festival.