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Rare Books Room: An Introduction Fri 15 Feb 2019   14:30 Finished

An introduction to the UL's Rare Books Reading Room and its collections, which include material from the first European printing presses and from the wider world up to the present day.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Understanding how the book is made is vital to the study of its contents, helping to locate its economic and social context, its audience, and ultimately its historical significance. Using examples from the Whipple Library’s rare book collections and the University Library’s Historical Printing Collection, this workshop series will explore some bibliographical techniques to identify and describe the structure and production of printed material from the handpress (C16-C18) and mechanized (C19) periods, and consider the uses and abuses of online derivatives. Although the focus will be on scientific texts and illustrations, these sessions will be of interest to book historians in all disciplines, and all are welcome.

Session one - 'Survey of the handpress period' Session two - 'Book production in the handpress period and bibliographical analysis' Session three - ' The technology of book production in the handpress period' Session four - The production and analysis of images in handpress period books' Session five - 'Book production in the 19th century'

Showcasing Tools and Resources for Graduates Thu 28 Feb 2019   15:00 Finished

In this informal session you will be able to learn more about various topics and resources, including

  • reference management
  • text mining
  • data visualisation
  • tools for structuring long-term writing projects
  • resources for legal research
  • copyright and Creative Commons

You will be able to rotate between these different areas, exploring tools on the areas that interest you most and how they can help your research, or what you feel you need to learn more about. The session will be led by librarians from across the different Schools in the university, and from the University Library.

Please only sign up for one of the sessions. There are no fixed time slots so feel free to drop in and out as you wish within your allocated hour.

Showcasing Tools and Resources for Graduates (STEMM) new Tue 21 Jan 2020   12:00 [Places]

This event will allow participants to explore lots of different tools and resources that can help them with their work at Cambridge.

Tools and resources on offer include:

  • reference management software (Zotero & Mendeley)
  • sharing your work (social media and academic platforms)
  • managing your time and work (time management apps & cloud storage)
  • presenting your work (Canva & using Creative Commons)

Participants will be able to rotate between different areas to hear short presentations (15 mins) and explore tools that they want to know more about. Handouts on all the tools and resources on offer will be available. The event will be led by librarians from across the Cambridge University Libraries community.

Participants can drop in to the event at any convenient time but we do encourage you to book so we can have an idea of numbers. All are welcome but this event will have a particular relevance for STEMM graduate students and researchers.

You do not have to stay for the full event duration.

Food and refreshments will be available on a first come, first served basis.

Social Media Drop-in Clinic - Blogging new Tue 14 Nov 2017   12:00 Finished

This drop-in clinic will allow participants to get bespoke blogging support, so whether you're starting out or have been writing for a while, come along and find out more about communicating STEM online.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members. Booking not required but is strongly encouraged so we have an idea of numbers.

Social Media Drop-in Clinic - Twitter new Mon 13 Nov 2017   12:00 Finished

This drop-in clinic will allow participants to get bespoke Twitter support, so whether you're starting out on Twitter or have been using it for a while and want some new tips, come along and pick our brains on communicating in 140 characters!

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members. Booking not required but is strongly encouraged so we have an idea of numbers.

So You Think You Can Read… new Fri 10 Nov 2017   14:00 Finished

Knowing how to read academic literature can be harder than it might seem and being able to maximise your time to get through as much research as possible are key skills for any successful researcher. In this session, we will help you develop your ability to read productively so you can become a Super Reader.

This session will provide an overview of the support and resources available from libraries and other useful departments from across the University of Cambridge. It will also provide an introduction to the STEMM Research Skills Development Programme sessions offered by library staff on a wide range of useful research themes and skills.

After this session, participants will have a better understanding of what services are out there to help support them in their time at Cambridge and who they can ask for help.

Take a Break: Press the Stress - Historical Printing new Tue 14 May 2019   16:30 Finished

Come to the Library’s Historical Printing Room. Set your name in type and hand-print an illustrated keepsake as a memento of your visit.

On top of the millions of books held at the University Library, we also have a considerable collection of printing artefacts. This began with a decision in the early 1970s to set up a bibliographical teaching press on the lines of those already existing at the Bodleian, University College London and elsewhere. The impetus for this plan came from the late Philip Gaskell, then Librarian of Trinity College. The main aim was to enable students of literature to understand the practical details of hand composition of type and of printing on a hand-press, and thus to appreciate the ways in which both conscious decisions and accidents in the printing house could affect the accuracy of a text.

http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/departments/rare-books/collections/historical-printing-room

Take a break: Twenty Minute UL Tower Tour new Fri 14 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

Take a break from revision stress with a twenty minute guided tour of the famous UL Tower. An experienced member of staff will take you up one of Cambridge's tallest structures where you can experience dazzling views of Cambridge as well as seeing some of the unique material that the tower holds.

Please be aware that access to the Tower is by lift/elevator only.

The Diversifying Nature of Impact Wed 18 Apr 2018   10:30 Finished

The diversifying nature of impact

Pep Pàmies, the Chief Editor of Nature Biomedical Engineering, will provide tips on how to convey your research for broader impact, and discuss the jobs that selective scientific journals need to increasingly take on.

Refreshments, including a sandwich lunch, will be provided. Please arrive promptly for a 10:30am start.

Collecting impact evidence from social media of publications, conference papers or any other scholarly output can be complicated and time-consuming. In this session, we'll introduce you to a number of tools that can help to streamline and simplify these processes: IFTTT, Twitter analytics, Altmetric and ImpactStory.

A tour of the University Library Music Department, including a visit of our closed access material behind the scenes. We will also give you lots of practical tips on getting the most out of the University Library music collections.

A tour of the University Library Music Department, including a visit of our closed access material behind the scenes.

Train the trainer: How to give a tour of the UL new Mon 30 Apr 2018   09:00 Finished

Cambridge University Library is one of the top research libraries in the world and holds over 8 million items. If you are a member of Library staff at a college, department or faculty library and would like to give your students introductory tours of the UL, then we would love to help you gain the knowledge and confidence to do that.

Email us today (research-skills@lib.cam.ac.uk) to organise a one-to-one tour with an experienced member of UL staff. We will guide you through the orientation tour route that we use for our own tours and can answer any questions that you may have.

Cambridge University Library is one of the top research libraries in the world and holds over 8 million items. If you are a member of Library staff at a college, department or faculty library and would like to give your students introductory tours of the UL, then we would love to help you gain the knowledge and confidence to do that.

Email us today (research-skills@lib.cam.ac.uk) to get started. We can give advice via email or by telephone (including sharing our tour notes and guidance) or we can organise a one-to-one tour for you with an experienced member of UL staff. We will guide you through the orientation tour route that we use for our own tours and can answer any questions that you may have.

Using Collaborative Tools for Research new Thu 7 Mar 2019   10:00 Finished

This session will give a brief overview of several tools that can be used for collaborative research. Participants will be introduced to Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs), collaborative online writing tools such as Overleaf, OneNote and Evernote, before finishing with a look at GitHub.

Using Twitter for Research Tue 12 Nov 2019   13:00 Finished

This session will cover the basic principles of the microblogging platform Twitter. Participants will have the opportunity to get to grips with using Twitter and understanding the platform’s unique community and language through hands-on activities. Aspects of science communication will be touched upon as well as examples of best practice, using Twitter personally and professionally, before concluding with some top tips on getting the most out of this communication tool.

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Who Can You Really Trust In Science? Fri 25 Oct 2019   10:00 Finished

There are lots of "experts" out there in science but how do you know who you can trust and who should be taken with a pinch of salt?

This session will enable participants to develop critical evaluation skills around trustworthiness in scientific disciplines by evaluating different indicators of perceived quality such as seniority, funding, publishing records and even celebrity status. Participants will work through anonymised case studies in groups as well as being introduced to concepts such as publishing, open science and reproducibility, fake news, and effective science communication.

This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Working with Digital Manuscripts new Wed 6 Feb 2019   10:00 Finished

Session 1: Introduction to working with digital manuscripts This workshop will introduce you to digital manuscripts by exploring how and where to find them, what to expect when you do, understanding digital manuscript resources and what you can do with them.

Session 2: Tools for working with digitised manuscripts This workshop will introduce you to some of the tools that can be used when working with digital manuscripts. We will also explore further ideas and tools in addition to some other sources for assistance and further learning opportunities.

Special collections of printed books and archives are the primary sources of much research in HPS. This session will introduce some of the many significant collections in Cambridge, and discuss the tools available online and in print to help you identify, locate and compare relevant material further afield.

This session introduces participants to the importance of good referencing practices within their work. The University of Cambridge’s position on plagiarism will be presented before moving on to a discussion around good referencing techniques, using the Harvard referencing style as an example. Participants will see a live demonstration of the reference management tool Zotero before taking part in a quiz to consolidate their knowledge.

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

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