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This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics.

  • Where should you publish your research?
  • What publishing format should you choose?

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively.

Publishing Your Research Effectively Thu 5 Mar 2020   10:00 [Places]

This session will cover the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively through publication. It will introduce how you should decide which academic journal is most appropriate for your research, including considerations such as journal rankings, publication times, fees and your own publication history. It will also cover the benefits and practicalities of using pre-print servers and registered reports.

Please bring your own internet-enabled device to this session.

Rare Books Resources for History Mon 10 Nov 2014   10:30 Finished

The UL's Rare Book collections include a range of high-quality subscribed online resources which contain a wealth of source material. This hands-on session designed specifically for History students will introduce key online rare book resources for this field. You will also learn about the print research resources available within the Rare Books department.

This session relates to early source material (pre-1900) and is not intended as an introduction to general databases and research sources. Please see the Information Skills strand of the programme for these courses.

The UL's Rare Book collections include a range of high-quality subscribed online resources which contain a wealth of source material. This hands-on session designed specifically for Language and Literature students will introduce key online rare book resources for this field. You will also learn about the print research resources available within the Rare Books department. (Please note this session relates to early source material (pre-1900) and is not a general introduction to LibrarySearch or current article databases.)

Rare Books Room: An Introduction Fri 15 Feb 2019   14:30 Finished

An introduction to the UL's Rare Books Reading Room and its collections, which include material from the first European printing presses and from the wider world up to the present day.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Understanding how the book is made is vital to the study of its contents, helping to locate its economic and social context, its audience, and ultimately its historical significance. Using examples from the Whipple Library’s rare book collections and the University Library’s Historical Printing Collection, this workshop series will explore some bibliographical techniques to identify and describe the structure and production of printed material from the handpress (C16-C18) and mechanized (C19) periods, and consider the uses and abuses of online derivatives. Although the focus will be on scientific texts and illustrations, these sessions will be of interest to book historians in all disciplines, and all are welcome.

Session one - 'Survey of the handpress period' Session two - 'Book production in the handpress period and bibliographical analysis' Session three - ' The technology of book production in the handpress period' Session four - The production and analysis of images in handpress period books' Session five - 'Book production in the 19th century'

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