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Theme: Research Skills

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This session introduces participants to the importance of good referencing practices within their work. The University of Cambridge’s position on plagiarism will be presented before moving on to a discussion around good referencing techniques, using the Harvard referencing style as an example. Participants will see a live demonstration of the reference management tool Zotero before taking part in a quiz to consolidate their knowledge.

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Referencing where you got ideas and inspiration from for your research is a core skill for any good researcher. In this session, you will learn about the University of Cambridge's approach to plagiarism, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to avoid being caught out through bad referencing techniques. You will also be shown handy tools that can do a lot of the work for you as well as managing your literature reading list throughout your work and beyond.

Bring along your laptop, tablet or mobile phone to join in with our interactive referencing quiz and put your knowledge to the test! You might even win a prize!

You own your own research right? Well it depends. In this session we will explore the sometimes very complicated world of copyright and what can happen when you publish your work. We'll also introduce you to concepts such as third party copyright, and how you can use existing licencing tools to maximise the reach of your research as well as using other peoples work to advance your own, but legally.

The Graduate Self-Assessment tool is intended for those in the Humanities & Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities schools. It is the first step in an online module designed to help you to assess your own skill-set, identify target areas for improvement and make decisions about what to do next. The tool is recommended for all first year postgraduates, but will be available for you to return to check on your progress.

Once you have completed the self-assessment exercise a number of options for developing your skills will become available to you, ranging from reading articles to signing up for relevant face-to-face workshops.

We encourage students to take the survey about once a year, but it is particularly useful for those who are just starting their PhD and for those who are just entering the final year of their PhD.

You will need to click here to gain access to the self-assessment tool.

If you already know the basics of Research Data Management (RDM) – for example backing up your work, file storage options - but now need to know more about effective strategies for sharing your data, then this course is for you!

This course gives a brief recap on RDM and then covers managing personal and sensitive data in the context of the new GDPR legislation, why it is a Good Thing to share your data, and how to do this most effectively in terms of describing your data, deciding where to share it, and using licences to control how your data is used by others. You will even get to write your own Data Management Plan (DMP): these help you manage your data throughout a project and after it has ended and are increasingly required as part of a grant or fellowship application. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you are completely new to the concept of research data management then the beginners course is for you.

What would happen to your research data if your lab exploded, or your laptop was stolen, or your cloud storage account was hacked? How could you prevent data loss in these situations? Managing your data effectively is vital to help you do this.

This workshop will introduce the basic principles of Research Data Management (RDM) and how they are relevant throughout the research life cycle.

Intended for those who are new to RDM, this course will firstly explain what RDM is, and then go on to cover basic data back-up and storage options, file sharing tools, and strategies for organising your data, as well as providing guidance on managing personal or sensitive data. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you already have a basic understanding of RDM then the advanced course is probably more appropriate for you to attend.

This session covers the essential pieces of information needed to perform searches for eresources, ejournals and ebooks on the different interfaces available to you in Cambridge. It includes recommended approaches to searching articles in journals and appropriate citation databases in different subject areas. You will be guided to preferred routes to access resources off campus and given help on the various platforms for accessing ebooks.

Find What You Need Fast - Life Sciences Resources new Mon 30 Oct 2017   15:00 Finished

This session will show what electronic resources are available to researchers in the Life Sciences. You will be shown how to effectively search specialist databases so you can get exactly what you want, when you want from University of Cambridge resources.

This session will show what electronic resources are available to researchers in the Physical Sciences and Technology areas. You will be shown how to effectively search specialist databases so you can get exactly what you want, when you want from University of Cambridge resources.

Getting Recognition for Your Own Research new Tue 21 Nov 2017   12:00 Finished

This session will introduce participants to the wonderful world of open access, pre-prints, ORCiD, Symplectic and even Creative Commons licencing. All these tools and systems can help you gain recognition and keep ownership of your research, as well as sharing it widely with others raising your research profile all at the same time.

The session will open with a presentation and will then move into a 1-2-1 focused drop-in clinic where participants can explore individual tools with help from library staff.

Session structure:

12pm-1pm: Presentation overview of the tools and services covered in session

1pm-2pm: Drop-in clinic with 1-2-1 support from librarians looking at tools individually

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members. Booking not required but is strongly encouraged so we have an idea of numbers.

Getting started with Non-Print Legal Deposit new Fri 4 Jan 2019   11:30 Finished

By law, a copy of every UK print publication must be given to the British Library by its publishers, and to five other major libraries, including Cambridge University Library, that request it. Since April 2013 Legal Deposit has included material published digitally and online.

Non-print Legal Deposit material is accessed via designated PCs in the University Library and Affiliated Libraries.

With the amount of material now deposited electronically increasing, the University Library is offering informal training sessions with staff from the Reference Department. Whether you require a general overview or have specific enquiries, these sessions will be of help to you.

A member of staff will be available from 11.30-12.00 every Wednesday. There is no need to book a place; please make yourself known to staff at the enquiry desk in the main Reading Room.

Getting to Know Scopus Mon 25 Nov 2019   10:00 [Places]

Scopus is a citation and abstract database of peer-reviewed literature that can be used by researchers to determine the impact of specific authors, articles/documents, and journals. It contains over 76 million records in the areas of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, arts, and humanities. In Scopus, it is possible to perform quick searches by document, author, or affiliation. You will learn how to perform basic searches, analyse the results, check affiliation and researcher profiles and consult journal metrics for the over 23,000 titles currently in Scopus.

This session will be delivered by Dr Charles Martinez, Senior Customer Consultant, Elsevier.

Please bring your own device so you are able to follow along with the session examples.

Help! I Need to Find Stuff For My Project Now! new Tue 22 Oct 2019   13:00 Finished

This session equips participants with all the fundamental skills that they need to build and execute effective search strategies to locate and critically evaluate relevant materials for assignments, literature reviews, projects and other related research activities. The structure of the session with move through the processes of basic keyword generation, constructing search strings, understanding which resources to search, before finishing with developing critical evaluation skills to assess quality and relevance of found items

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

This session will introduce participants to different methods of communicating research before moving on to a discussion around best practice and techniques when preparing a presentation. Participants will be introduced to concepts around good design, accessibility, data presentation, and accessing Creative Commons licenced materials for their work. The session will conclude with an exploration of good delivery techniques with additional advice on what to do if it all goes wrong.

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

This session will help prepare you to begin your literature review. You will learn strategies for searching for relevant material, how to troubleshoot common search problems, and how to stay up to date with new publications in your field.

Please bring a laptop, tablet or other web-enabled devide with you to the session.

This session will develop skills that will help you get the most out of your literature review. From a foundation of effective search strategies, you will learn how to critically appraise academic literature, techniques for getting through sources quickly and evaluating their relevance, engaging with key material and beginning to write your literature review itself, as well as ensuring accuracy in your citations and references.

Please bring a laptop, tablet or other web-enabled device with you to the session.

How To Prepare A Polished Conference Poster new Tue 14 May 2019   13:00 Finished

Need to create a conference poster but are not sure where to start? This session will introduce participants to the fundamentals of designing an effective and engaging poster that is perfect for communicating research ideas. The session will look at good design practice, where to source free high quality graphics, as well as deciding what you should (and maybe shouldn't) include in your final poster.

iDiscover: Drop-in Surgery new Fri 8 Feb 2019   09:00 Finished

Need help with iDiscover? Call in at the General Enquiries Helpdesk (on the landing above the Entrance Hall) where a member of Library staff will be able to help you search our print and online collections, answer any questions you have, or give you a general overview.

Every Friday between 9.00 and 10.15.

Presentation and Q&A discussion on all matters relating to image copyright. This will be an informal brown-bag session, so feel free to bring your lunch.

An introduction to the use of the specialist Theology and Religious studies bibliographic database ATLA for undergraduates, providing information on how to make the most effective use of this resource; of particular relevance to those preparing or working on a dissertation and wanting to acquire wider bibliographic information on a specific topic.

Level Up Your Search Strategy Fri 26 Jan 2018   13:00 Finished

This session will help participants develop skills to get them searching for research quickly and efficiently. The session will start with a demonstration of Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed and MathSciNet before moving onto less traditional resources such as arXiv and a focused look at how to get Google to work for you. So level up your searching skills with your friendly librarians at the Moore!

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

Making Your Research Impactful Fri 22 Nov 2019   14:00 [Places]

This session explores why you should share your all research as widely as possible and how you can go about doing so. It will demonstrate the potential that Open Research can have in maximising exposure for your work and how you can track and trace how your research is being shared online.

Please bring your own internet-enabled device to this session.

Managing your bibliography (Zotero for beginners) Thu 14 Nov 2019   15:00 CANCELLED

This session will introduce you to Zotero (https://www.zotero.org/), a free tool to manage bibliographies and bibliographic databases.

Managing Your Online Presence Tue 19 Nov 2019   14:30 [Places]

This session will introduce participants to the wide range of platforms and services that are available to help you manage your online presence as a researcher. We'll look at academic tools like ORCID, Google Scholar and ResearchGate/Academia.edu, as well as an overview of some of the more popular social media platforms. We'll also have discussions around issues such as the risks of sharing research through these platforms and reaching wider audiences. We will also show participants how to flip these tools and use them to access research for their own work too.

Managing Your Online Presence Tue 5 Nov 2019   13:00 CANCELLED

This session demonstrates the importance of a good online presence for participants from exploring what comes up through a quick Google search all the way through to maintaining profiles on academic networking sites. The legalities of using such sites in the context of publisher and open access copyright compliance is also discussed

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Managing Your Research Data Tue 29 Oct 2019   13:00 CANCELLED

This session introduces participants to the concept of research data and all the forms that it can take. It will then look at managing different types of data depending on its type, such as its sensitivity. Different storage methods are discussed as well as best practice approaches to avoid serious data loss during a research project. Effective data management approaches will be explored, as well as how to create a data management plan, before concluding with an overview of useful tools and services

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Metrics: the Good, the Bad, the Ugly Thu 29 Nov 2018   10:00 Finished

This session aims to help you navigate your way through the metrics maze. It will enable you to discover research by using metrics and how metrics can determine online impact.

It will introduce article metrics, personal indicators such as the H-index, and altmetrics. Various tools including Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and Altmetric will be demonstrated. Please bring your own device if you wish to follow along with the session.

Open Science and Your Research Mon 14 Oct 2019   11:00 CANCELLED

Open Science concepts and tools have the potential to transform the current scientific system for the greater good of all, but what does it mean for you? How can you and your work benefit from the Open Science movement? Welcome to a workshop run by ORION Open Science.

This workshop will establish what Open Science is and why it is needed. There will be an overview of the main areas of Open Science: Open Access, Open Data, Public Engagement. Dr Kevin Kunzmann will share his experiences of Open Science and why he believes in the movement. In addition, there will be some practical tips on changes researchers can make towards Open Science, the potential career benefits of Open Science, and information on what resources the ORION project can provide. The session is suitable for those with very little or basic knowledge of open science.

This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members.

This session is part of our gaming-themed Moore Methods lunchtime series of talks.

Publishing Your Research Effectively Wed 30 Oct 2019   10:00 Finished

This session will cover the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively through publication. It will introduce how you should decide which academic journal is most appropriate for your research, including considerations such as journal rankings, publication times, fees and your own publication history. It will also cover the benefits and practicalities of using pre-print servers and registered reports.

Please bring your own internet-enabled device to this session.

Showcasing Tools and Resources for Graduates (STEMM) new Tue 26 Nov 2019   12:00 [Places]

This event will allow participants to explore lots of different tools and resources that can help them with their work at Cambridge.

Tools and resources on offer include:

  • reference management software (Zotero & Mendeley)
  • sharing your work (social media and academic platforms)
  • managing your time and work (time management apps & cloud storage)
  • presenting your work (Canva & using Creative Commons)

Participants will be able to rotate between different areas to hear short presentations (15 mins) and explore tools that they want to know more about. Handouts on all the tools and resources on offer will be available. The event will be led by librarians from across the Cambridge University Libraries community.

Participants can drop in to the event at any convenient time but we do encourage you to book so we can have an idea of numbers. All are welcome but this event will have a particular relevance for STEMM graduate students and researchers.

You do not have to stay for the full event duration.

Food and refreshments will be available on a first come, first served basis.

So You Think You Can Read… new Fri 10 Nov 2017   14:00 Finished

Knowing how to read academic literature can be harder than it might seem and being able to maximise your time to get through as much research as possible are key skills for any successful researcher. In this session, we will help you develop your ability to read productively so you can become a Super Reader.

Social Media Drop-in Clinic - Blogging new Tue 14 Nov 2017   12:00 Finished

This drop-in clinic will allow participants to get bespoke blogging support, so whether you're starting out or have been writing for a while, come along and find out more about communicating STEM online.

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members. Booking not required but is strongly encouraged so we have an idea of numbers.

Social Media Drop-in Clinic - Twitter new Mon 13 Nov 2017   12:00 Finished

This drop-in clinic will allow participants to get bespoke Twitter support, so whether you're starting out on Twitter or have been using it for a while and want some new tips, come along and pick our brains on communicating in 140 characters!

While the session has a STEM focus, it is open to all University members. Booking not required but is strongly encouraged so we have an idea of numbers.

This session will provide an overview of the support and resources available from libraries and other useful departments from across the University of Cambridge. It will also provide an introduction to the Researcher Development Programme STEMM sessions offered by library staff on a wide range of useful research themes and skills.

After this session, participants will have a better understanding of what services are out there to help support them in their time at Cambridge and who they can ask for help.

Using Collaborative Tools for Research new Thu 7 Mar 2019   10:00 Finished

This session will give a brief overview of several tools that can be used for collaborative research. Participants will be introduced to Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs), collaborative online writing tools such as Overleaf, OneNote and Evernote, before finishing with a look at GitHub.

Using Twitter for Research Tue 12 Nov 2019   13:00 Finished

This session will cover the basic principles of the microblogging platform Twitter. Participants will have the opportunity to get to grips with using Twitter and understanding the platform’s unique community and language through hands-on activities. Aspects of science communication will be touched upon as well as examples of best practice, using Twitter personally and professionally, before concluding with some top tips on getting the most out of this communication tool.

This session will take place in the Pink Room. If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Who Can You Really Trust In Science? Fri 25 Oct 2019   10:00 Finished

There are lots of "experts" out there in science but how do you know who you can trust and who should be taken with a pinch of salt?

This session will enable participants to develop critical evaluation skills around trustworthiness in scientific disciplines by evaluating different indicators of perceived quality such as seniority, funding, publishing records and even celebrity status. Participants will work through anonymised case studies in groups as well as being introduced to concepts such as publishing, open science and reproducibility, fake news, and effective science communication.

This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Zotero for Graduates Fri 20 Oct 2017   12:00 Finished

The aim of the workshop is to give an overview of how graduate students can make effective use of Zotero software for referencing and managing information.

You may have already thought about using Zotero, in which case you will find this workshop especially helpful if you have already downloaded Zotero to your laptop and bring it with you.

This workshop will especially suit graduate students from the School of Arts and Humanities, or Humanities and Social Sciences.

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