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Department of Chemistry

Department of Chemistry course timetable

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Tue 30 Oct 2018 – Wed 6 Feb

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[ No events on Tue 30 Oct 2018 ]

November 2018

Wed 7
CT6 Solid State NMR Spectroscopy (1 of 2) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

The aim of this course is to provide an idea of what kind of scientific problems can be solved by solid state NMR. It will cover how NMR can be used to study molecular structure, nanostructure and dynamics in the solid state, including heterogeneous solids, such as polymers, MOFs, energy-storage and biological materials. No previous knowledge of solid state NMR will be required, just a basic working knowledge of solution-state NMR for 1H and 13C, i.e. undergraduate level NMR. In order to highlight the utility of this technique, some materials based research using solid state NMR will also be covered.

Fri 9
CT6 Solid State NMR Spectroscopy (2 of 2) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

The aim of this course is to provide an idea of what kind of scientific problems can be solved by solid state NMR. It will cover how NMR can be used to study molecular structure, nanostructure and dynamics in the solid state, including heterogeneous solids, such as polymers, MOFs, energy-storage and biological materials. No previous knowledge of solid state NMR will be required, just a basic working knowledge of solution-state NMR for 1H and 13C, i.e. undergraduate level NMR. In order to highlight the utility of this technique, some materials based research using solid state NMR will also be covered.

Wed 14
CT9 Atomic Force Microscopy (1 of 2) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

Probe microscopy is a general term for a class of microscopy in which well-defined nanoscale probes are used to interact with a sample in some manner. In this introductory lecture the necessary background principles to understand probe microscopy are explained with reference to Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy in both tapping and contact mode. This will provide the user with the necessary background to make the most of the increasingly well-used Departmental Keysight 5500 multimode system, which is operated and maintained by the Melville Lab. Probe microscopy is of interest to anyone with a need to perform single molecule or surface based studies. Typically anything involving a surface interaction is accessible and the technique is particularly well suited to studying a variety of chemical and electromechanical properties of aggregates with 1-1000 nm dimensions. Recently, the system has been used to study cellulose crystals, amyloid fibres, protein monolayers, thermal properties of polymer films, doped graphite and so on.

Other modes are available on the Keysight system such as pico-trec, electrochemical STM, EFM, KFM, MFM, and LFM and these modes will be described but not explained in detail during the lecture.

Thu 15
CT7 X-Ray Crystallography (1 of 3) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

These lectures will introduce the basics of crystallography and diffraction, assuming no prior knowledge. The aim is to provide an overview that will inspire and serve as a basis for researchers to use the Department’s single-crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction facilities or to appreciate more effectively results obtained through the Department’s crystallographic services. The final lecture will be devoted to searching and visualising crystallographic data using the Cambridge Structural Database system.

Fri 23
CT7 X-Ray Crystallography (2 of 3) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

These lectures will introduce the basics of crystallography and diffraction, assuming no prior knowledge. The aim is to provide an overview that will inspire and serve as a basis for researchers to use the Department’s single-crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction facilities or to appreciate more effectively results obtained through the Department’s crystallographic services. The final lecture will be devoted to searching and visualising crystallographic data using the Cambridge Structural Database system.

Mon 26
CT7 X-Ray Crystallography (3 of 3) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

These lectures will introduce the basics of crystallography and diffraction, assuming no prior knowledge. The aim is to provide an overview that will inspire and serve as a basis for researchers to use the Department’s single-crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction facilities or to appreciate more effectively results obtained through the Department’s crystallographic services. The final lecture will be devoted to searching and visualising crystallographic data using the Cambridge Structural Database system.

CT9 Atomic Force Microscopy (2 of 2) Finished 14:30 - 15:30 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

Probe microscopy is a general term for a class of microscopy in which well-defined nanoscale probes are used to interact with a sample in some manner. In this introductory lecture the necessary background principles to understand probe microscopy are explained with reference to Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy in both tapping and contact mode. This will provide the user with the necessary background to make the most of the increasingly well-used Departmental Keysight 5500 multimode system, which is operated and maintained by the Melville Lab. Probe microscopy is of interest to anyone with a need to perform single molecule or surface based studies. Typically anything involving a surface interaction is accessible and the technique is particularly well suited to studying a variety of chemical and electromechanical properties of aggregates with 1-1000 nm dimensions. Recently, the system has been used to study cellulose crystals, amyloid fibres, protein monolayers, thermal properties of polymer films, doped graphite and so on.

Other modes are available on the Keysight system such as pico-trec, electrochemical STM, EFM, KFM, MFM, and LFM and these modes will be described but not explained in detail during the lecture.

Tue 27
IS3 Research Information Skills for Graduate Students Finished 09:00 - 11:00 Unilever Lecture Theatre

This compulsory course will equip you with the skills required to manage the research information you will need to gather throughout your graduate course, as well as the publications you will produce yourself. It will also help you enhance your online research profile and measure the impact of research.

A short break for refreshments will be included

Wed 28
CT8 Electron Microscopy (1 of 2) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

The first session will describe the basics of electron diffraction and the main differences from X-ray and neutron diffraction, particularly as regards the strength of the interaction and the complications caused by multiple scattering. The advantages of the method in determining unit cell dimensions will also be discussed.

Session two will concentrate on the advantages conferred by forming images with electrons but also on the inherent problems such as the effect of aberrations on the ultimate resolution. If there is sufficient time, a consideration of the information available in high resolution images will be made.

Thu 29
IS4 Research Data Management for Graduate Students Finished 09:00 - 11:00 Chemistry of Health

This compulsory session introduces Research Data Management (RDM) to Chemistry PhD students. It is highly interactive and utilises practical activities throughout.

Key topics covered are:

  • Research Data Management (RDM) - what it is and what problems can occur with managing and sharing your data.
  • Data backup and file sharing - possible consequences of not backing up your data, strategies for backing up your data and sharing your data safely.
  • Data organisation - how to organise your files and folders, what is best practice.
  • Data sharing - obstacles to sharing your data, benefits and importance of sharing your data, the funder policy landscape, resources available in the University to help you share your data.
  • Data management planning - creating a roadmap for how not to get lost in your data!

Lunch and refreshments are included for this course

Fri 30
CT8 Electron Microscopy (2 of 2) Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Department of Chemistry, Unilever Lecture Theatre

The first session will describe the basics of electron diffraction and the main differences from X-ray and neutron diffraction, particularly as regards the strength of the interaction and the complications caused by multiple scattering. The advantages of the method in determining unit cell dimensions will also be discussed.

Session two will concentrate on the advantages conferred by forming images with electrons but also on the inherent problems such as the effect of aberrations on the ultimate resolution. If there is sufficient time, a consideration of the information available in high resolution images will be made.

December 2018

Wed 5

The main aim of giving a presentation to the public or a science venue is to present information in a way that the audience will remember at a later time. There are several ways in which we can improve this type of impact with an audience. This interactive lecture explores some of those mechanisms.

Fri 7

The main aim of giving a presentation to the public or a science venue is to present information in a way that the audience will remember at a later time. There are several ways in which we can improve this type of impact with an audience. This interactive lecture explores some of those mechanisms.

This session will require 4-5 volunteers to provide a 10 min talk which the session will show how to improve. Presenters in the following week's Peer to Peer presentations will be given priority booking for this event.

January 2019

Mon 14
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (1 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

Wed 16
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (2 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

FS8 Supervising Undergraduates Finished 13:00 - 14:00 U203

In this short talk we will cover what supervisions are, the role they play in Cambridge teaching, and how supervisors are recruited. We will then go on to look at how you can prepare for supervising, how you can conduct a supervision, and how to deal with common pitfalls.

Mon 21
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (3 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

Wed 23
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (4 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

Thu 24
FS1 Successful Completion of a Research Degree & FS2 Dignity@Study Finished 12:00 - 13:30 Unilever Lecture Theatre

FS1 - Successful Completion of a Research Degree An hour devoted to a discussion of how to plan your time effectively on a day to day basis, how to produce a dissertation/thesis (from first year report to MPhil to PhD) and the essential requirements of an experimental section.

FS2 - Dignity@Study The University of Cambridge is committed to protecting the dignity of staff, students, visitors to the University, and all members of the University community in their work and their interactions with others. The University expects all members of the University community to treat each other with respect, courtesy and consideration at all times. All members of the University community have the right to expect professional behaviour from others, and a corresponding responsibility to behave professionally towards others. Nick will explore what this means for graduate students in this Department and the session will conclude with tea/coffee and biscuits, in order to provide an opportunity to ask questions more informally.

This is a compulsory session for 1st year post-graduates.

Fri 25

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Mon 28
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (5 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

The CCDC is the home of small molecule crystallography data and is a leader in software for pharmaceutical discovery, materials development, research and education.

The CCDC compiles and distributes the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), the world's repository of experimentally determined organic and metal-organic crystal structures. It also produces associated knowledge-based application software for the global community of structural chemists, delivered through the CSD-System, CSD-Discovery, CSD-Materials and CSD-Enterprise.

The CCDC originated in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge, and is now a fully independent institution constituted as a non-profit company and a registered charity.

Ian Bruno, Head of Strategic Partnerships at the CCDC, will present this session. Ian will firstly introduce the CCDC and the CSD, and will then focus on enablers for FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) chemistry data, including standard identifiers (e.g. InChI), standard file formats (e.g. for spectra), open file formats (e.g. for structures), and vocabularies.

A second session will follow on identifiers and extensions to the InChI that have been introduced in this session, to be presented by Professor Jonathan Goodman (IS9 course).

Refreshments (tea, coffee, biscuits) are included for this session.

Wed 30
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (6 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

February 2019

Mon 4
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (7 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

Wed 6
SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists (8 of 8) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 G30

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

This compulsory session introduces Research Data Management (RDM) to Chemistry PhD students. It is highly interactive and utilises practical activities throughout.

Key topics covered are:

  • Research Data Management (RDM) - what it is and what problems can occur with managing and sharing your data.
  • Data backup and file sharing - possible consequences of not backing up your data, strategies for backing up your data and sharing your data safely.
  • Data organisation - how to organise your files and folders, what is best practice.
  • Data sharing - obstacles to sharing your data, benefits and importance of sharing your data, the funder policy landscape, resources available in the University to help you share your data.
  • Data management planning - creating a roadmap for how not to get lost in your data!

Refreshments are included for this course