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Showing courses 101-118 of 118
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Protein Structure Analysis new Thu 24 May 2018   09:30 Finished

This course covers data resources and analytical approaches for the discovery and interpretation of biomacromolecular structures.

Day 1 focuses on public repositories of structural data (Protein Data Bank and Electron Microscopy Data Bank) and resources for protein analysis and classification (Pfam, InterPro and HMMER).

Day 2 covers how to find information about the structure and function of your protein sequence using CATH, principles of modern state-of-the-art protein modelling with Phyre2 and methods for predicting the effects of mutations on protein structure and function using the SAAP family of tools.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Protein Structure Analysis new Thu 20 Jun 2019   10:00 Finished

This course covers analytical approaches for the interpretation of biomacromolecular structures including how to find information about the structure and function of your protein sequence using CATH, principles of modern state-of-the-art protein modelling with Phyre2 and methods for predicting the effects of mutations on protein structure and function using the SAAP family of tools. In addition, we will look at mapping genetic variants onto structures as well as visualisation and basic analysis of protein structures.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Reproducible Research with R new Tue 18 Feb 2020   09:30 [Full]

This course introduces concepts about reproducibility that can be used when you are programming in R. We will explore how to create notebooks - a way to integrate your R analyses into reports using Rmarkdown. The course also introduces the concept of version control. We will learn how to create a repository on GitHub and how to work together on the same project collaboratively without creating conflicting versions of files.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The course will teach intermediate R object-oriented programming and how to build a fully functional R package.

Relevant teaching materials are available here and the sequences example package used as template in the course can be found here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Snakemake workshop new Mon 6 Jan 2020   09:30 [Full]

Data analyses usually entail the application of many command line tools or scripts to transform, filter, aggregate or plot data and results. With ever increasing amounts of data being collected in science, reproducible and scalable automatic workflow management becomes increasingly important.

The Snakemake workflow management system is a tool to create reproducible and scalable data analyses. Workflows are described via a human readable, Python based language. They can be seamlessly scaled to server, cluster, grid and cloud environments, without the need to modify the workflow definition. Finally, Snakemake workflows can entail a description of required software, which will be automatically deployed to any execution environment.

With over 100k downloads on Bioconda, Snakemake is a widely used and accepted standard for reproducible data science that has powered numerous high impact publications.

This 2-day workshop with, at the first day, teach how to use Snakemake for reproducible data analysis. On the second day, we will further discuss advanced topics and everybody is welcome to apply the obtained knowledge for his or her own analysis project while getting help from the organizers.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Software Carpentry: Instructor training Mon 19 Sep 2016   09:30 Finished

This course is aimed at researchers who want to learn core skills and best practices for scientific computing. It will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

The course covers the core skills needed to be productive in a small research team:

  • Unix command line (and how to automate repetitive tasks);
  • Python or R (and how to grow a program in a modular, testable way); and
  • version control with Git (and how to track and share work efficiently).

Further information is available here.

Applicants for this course are requested to complete a pre-course survey. This will be used to tailor the course content to the audience research interests and background.

This event is organized in collaboration with Software Carpentry.

Statistical Analysis using R Fri 12 Jul 2019   09:30 Finished

Statistics are an important part of most modern studies and being able to effectively use a statistical package will help you to understand your results.

This course provides an introduction to some statistical techniques through the use of the R language. Topics covered include: Chi2 and Fisher tests, descriptive statistics, t-test, analysis of variance and regression.

Students will run analyses using statistical and graphical skills taught during the session.

The course manual can be found here.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Statistics bootcamp using R new Tue 25 Feb 2020   11:30 [Full]

This 4-days bootcamp provides an in depth look at statistical analyses using R.

Day 1 aims to introduce R as a tool for statistics and graphics, with the main aim being to become comfortable with the R environment. As well as introducing core R language concepts, this course also provides the basics of using the Tidyverse for data maniupulation, and ggplot for plotting. It will focus on entering and manipulating data in R and producing simple graphs.

Day 2-4 will focus on the statistical possibilities of R, covering from experimental design to analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Ample time will be given to participants to practice different type of analysis and interact with the trainers to discuss their statistical problems.

This event is organized in collaboration with the Babraham Institutes's Bioinformatics Group and it is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Statistics for Biologists in R Thu 19 Sep 2019   09:30 Finished

This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in practical statistics and data analysis using the R software environment. The underlying philosophy of the course is to treat statistics as a practical skill rather than as a theoretical subject and as such the course focuses on methods for addressing real-life issues in the biological sciences using the R software package.

In this course we explore classical statistical analysis techniques starting with simple hypothesis testing and building up to multiple linear regression. The focus of the course is on practical implementation of these techniques and developing robust statistical analysis skills rather than on the underlying statistical theory.

After the course you should feel confident to be able to select and implement common statistical techniques using R and moreover know when, and when not, to apply these techniques.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This 1-week course aims to provide an introduction to the best practices and tools needed to perform bioinformatics research effectively and reproducibly.

Focusing on solutions around handling biological data, we will cover introductory lessons in data manipulation and visualisation in R, statistical analyses, and reproducibility. The R component of the course will cover from basic steps in R to how to use some of the most popular R packages (dplyr and ggplot2) for data manipulation and visualisation. No prior R experience or previous knowledge of programming/coding is required. The course also includes introductory sessions in statistics and working examples on how to analyse biological data. At the end of the course we will address issues relating to reusability and reproducibility.

More information about the course can be found here.

This course is run in collaboration with the Institute of Continuing Education.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Train the Trainer for Image Analysts Thu 30 May 2019   09:30 Finished

This course aims to provide trainers with guidance and tips for developing and delivering training in image analysis, exploring a range of methods appropriate to different learning styles and examining the requirements for a successful course (both scientific and logistic).

The first part of the course will give participants principles of training theory and best practises for developing and delivering their future training content; the second part will be a hackathon to kick start the development of a common set of training materials in image analysis.

This event is organized in collaboration with the Image Analysis Focused Interest Group and is supported by the Royal Microscopical Society.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Transcriptome Analysis for Non-Model Organisms new Mon 15 Apr 2019   09:30 Finished

RNA-Seq technology has been transformative in our ability to explore gene content and gene expression in all realms of biology, and de novo transcriptome assembly has enabled opportunities to expand transcriptome analysis to non-model organisms.

This course provides an overview of modern applications of transcriptome sequencing and popular tools, and algorithms, for exploring transcript reconstruction and expression analysis in a genome-free manner.

Attendees will perform quality assessment and upstream analysis of both Illumina and long reads single molecule sequencing data; the derived transcriptomes will be compared, annotated and used as reference for quantifying transcript expression, leveraging on Bioconductor tools for differential expression analysis. Additional methods will be explored for characterising the assembled transcriptome and revealing biological findings.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Microscopy experiments have proven to be a powerful means of generating information-rich data for biological applications. From small-scale microscopy experiments to time-lapse movies and high-throughput screens, automatic image analysis is more objective and quantitative and less tedious than visual inspection.

This course will introduce users to the free open-source image analysis program CellProfiler and its companion data exploration program CellProfiler Analyst. We will show how CellProfiler can be used to analyse a variety of types of imaging experiments. We will also briefly discuss the basic principles of supervised machine learning with CellProfiler Analyst in order to score complex and subtle phenotypes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Using the Ensembl Genome Browser Wed 27 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

The Ensembl Project provides a comprehensive and integrated source of annotation of, mainly vertebrate, genome sequences. This workshop offers a comprehensive practical introduction to the use of the Ensembl genome browser as well as essential background information.

This course will focus on the vertebrate genomes in Ensembl, however much of what will be covered is also applicable to the non-vertebrates (plants, bacteria, fungi, metazoa and protists) in Ensembl Genomes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Variant Analysis with GATK Wed 12 Jul 2017   09:30 Finished

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling variants with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, using the “Best Practices” developed by the GATK team. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant discovery process, what are the operations performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset.

In the course of this workshop, we highlight key functionalities such as the germline GVCF workflow for joint variant discovery in cohorts, RNAseq­ specific processing, and somatic variant discovery using MuTect2. We also preview capabilities of the upcoming GATK version 4, including a new workflow for CNV discovery, and we demonstrate the use of pipelining tools to assemble and execute GATK workflows.

The workshop is composed of one day of lectures and two days of hands­on training, structured as follows. Day 1: theory and application of the Best Practices for Variant Discovery in high­throughput sequencing data. Day 2 and the morning of Day 3: hands­on exercises on how to manipulate the standard data formats involved in variant discovery and how to apply GATK tools appropriately to various use cases and data types. Day 3 afternoon: hands-on exercises on how to write workflow scripts using WDL, the Broad's new Workflow Description Language, and to execute these workflows locally as well as through a publicly accessible cloud-based service.

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non­human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non­-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Variant Discovery with GATK4 Mon 8 Jul 2019   09:30 Finished

This workshop will focus on the core steps involved in calling germline short variants, somatic short variants, and copy number alterations with the Broad’s Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), using “Best Practices” developed by the GATK methods development team. A team of methods developers and instructors from the Data Sciences Platform at Broad will give talks explaining the rationale, theory, and real-world applications of the GATK Best Practices. You will learn why each step is essential to the variant-calling process, what key operations are performed on the data at each step, and how to use the GATK tools to get the most accurate and reliable results out of your dataset. If you are an experienced GATK user, you will gain a deeper understanding of how the GATK works under-the-hood and how to improve your results further, especially with respect to the latest innovations.

  • Day 1: Introductory and Overview. The first day of the workshop gives a high-level overview of various topics in the morning, and in the afternoon we show how these concepts apply to a case study. The case study is tailored based on the audience, as represented by their answers in our pre-workshop survey.
  • Day 2: Germline Short Variant Discovery. Today we dive deep into the tools that make up the GATK Best Practices Pipeline. In the morning we discuss variant discovery, and in the afternoon we look at refinement and filtering. You will have the opportunity both in the morning and in the afternoon to get hands-on with these tools and run them yourself.
  • Day 3: Somatic Variant Discovery. Today we will cover Somatic Variant Discovery in more depth. In the morning we primarily focus on calling short variants with Mutect2, and in the afternoon we look at copy number alterations. Both sections have a paired hands-on activity.
  • Day 4: Pipelining. Over the first three days, you would have learned a lot about different pipelines and tools that you can use in GATK. Today we will be learning all about how those pipelines are written in a language called WDL. In the afternoon we cover other useful topics to working on the cloud, including Docker and BigQuery.

Please note that this workshop is focused on human data analysis. The majority of the materials presented does apply equally to non-human data, and we will address some questions regarding adaptations that are needed for analysis of non-human data, but we will not go into much detail on those points.

The hands-on GATK tutorials in this workshop will be conducted on Terra, a new platform developed at Broad in collaboration with Verily Life Sciences for accessing data, running analysis tools and collaborating securely and seamlessly.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

This course covers state-of-the-art tools and methods for NGS RNA-seq and exome variant data analysis, which are of major relevance in today's genomic and gene expression studies.

It is oriented to experimental researchers, post-doctoral and PhD students who want to learn about the state-of-the-art of genomic variant and transcriptomics data analysis methodologies and carry out their own analysis.

Further information is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Working with Python: functions and modules Wed 4 Jul 2018   09:30 Finished

This course will cover concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python with the aim of writing reusable code. In the morning session, we will briefly go over the basic syntax, data structures and control statements. This will be followed by an introduction to writing user-defined functions. We will finish the course by looking into how to incorporate existing python modules and packages into your programs as well as writing you own modules.

Course materials can be found here.

Note: this one-day course is the continuation of the Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python; participants are expected to have attended the introductory Python course and/or have acquired some working knowledge of Python. This course is also open to Python beginners who are already fluent in other programming languages as this will help them to quickly get started in Python.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

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