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All Bioinformatics courses

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Showing courses 71-80 of 119
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This event will consist of two parts. The first part of the workshop aims to provide new trainers with guidance and tips for developing and delivering training in bioinformatics, exploring a range of methods appropriate to different learning styles and examining the requirements for a successful course (both scientific and logistic). It will be based on the EXCELERATE Train-the-Trainer (TtT) course materials and content will be tailored to trainers that are involved in teaching bioinformatics to clinical audiences.

The second part of the workshop will focus on "Best practices in clinical bioinformatics training", providing an opportunity for people already involved in this kind of training, or in the process of developing it, to come together and exchange best practice/experiences. Participants will include training providers of the Health Education England’s MSc in Genomics Medicine from several UK Universities as well as other providers active in this area, from around Europe and beyond.

This event is co-sponsored by ELIXIR-EXCELERATE and Health Education England (HEE).

This course will present a set of R/Bioconductor packages to access, manipulate, visualise and analyse mass spectrometry (MS) and quantitative proteomics data.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Extracting biological information from gene lists Wed 22 Apr 2020   09:30 [Full]

Many experimental designs end up producing lists of hits, usually based around genes or transcripts. Sometimes these lists are small enough that they can be examined individually, but often it is useful to do a more structured functional analysis to try to automatically determine any interesting biological themes which turn up in the lists.

This course looks at the various software packages, databases and statistical methods which may be of use in performing such an analysis. As well as being a practical guide to performing these types of analysis the course will also look at the types of artefacts and bias which can lead to false conclusions about functionality and will look at the appropriate ways to both run the analysis and present the results for publication.

Course materials are available here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Finding and accessing human genome data new Mon 13 Mar 2017   09:30 Finished

Researchers rely on acquiring external data to validate, benchmark and supplement research findings. Funders require researchers to make their datasets accessible for further reuse.

The goal of this workshop is to bring to the fore existing challenges with genomic data access and reuse. We will introduce a number of tools and resources to simplify #dataaccess and #datasharing.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

This 2-days workshop will bring together bioimage analysts, trainers and developers from NEUBIAS, EuroBioImaging and Global BioImaging, as well as ELIXIR’s Bioschemas and TeSS developers, and anyone willing to contribute, to foster new collaborations between ELIXIR and key initiatives from the image analysis community, to:

  • Build a collection of curated image analysis training materials. Many materials are currently available online for several topics but no consistent curation has been applied to them to make them easily discoverable. During the workshop we will collate materials and ensure that, for each image analysis workflow, a minimum set of training materials is available, including slides, practical exercises, Docker container, etc.
  • Improve materials’ annotations (introducing full BioSchemas compliance) and align them with existing ELIXIR efforts (linking to TeSS). During the workshop, materials will be curated to ensure that they are properly described, according to the existing ELIXIR guidelines, and BioSchemas compliant. Consequently the curation will enable materials, hosted by individual providers, to be discoverable via TeSS.
  • Increase the number of Docker/Virtual Machines (VMs) available for easy installation of image analysis training environments. We will focus on: (i) specific pipelines for which containers currently do not exist, (ii) workflows that are of interest to the NEUBIAS/GBI communities and (iii) for which expertise will be available among the workshop participants. This would be incredibly helpful for running future image analysis courses, including the next GBI course planned for October 2018, as it would increase portability of training environments, reducing the burden of lengthy, and often troublesome, software installations.
Genome Annotation with Artemis Thu 28 May 2015   09:30 Finished

This one day workshop aims to give an introduction to Artemis and ACT (Artemis Comparison Tool). Both tools enable the visualization, analysis and comparison of genome data. They are freely available for all operating systems and can be downloaded here. This is a hands-on course with short talks introducing the tools. The course is taught by members of the Pathogen and Parasite Genomic Teams from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

Further information is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

High Performance Computing: An Introduction Thu 18 Oct 2018   09:30 Finished

The course aims to give an introductory overview of High Performance Computing (HPC) in general, and of the facilities of the High Performance Computing Service (HPCS) available at the University of Cambridge.

Practical examples of using the HPCS clusters will be used throughout, although it is hoped that much of the content will have applicability to systems elsewhere.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

IAFIG-RMS: Bioimage analysis with Python new charged Mon 9 Dec 2019   09:30 Finished

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULLY BOOKED!

The aim of this 5 days course is to develop motivated participants toward becoming independent BioImage Analysts in an imaging facility or research role. Participants will be taught theory and algorithms relating to bioimage analysis using Python as the primary coding language.

Lectures will focus on image analysis theory and applications. Topics to be covered include: Image Analysis and image processing, Python and Jupyter notebooks, Visualisation, Fiji to Python, Segmentation, Omero and Python, Image Registration, Colocalisation, Time-series analysis, Tracking, Machine Learning, and Applied Machine Learning.

The bulk of the practical work will focus on Python and how to code algorithms and handle data using Python. Fiji will be used as a tool to facilitate image analysis. Omero will be described and used for some interactive coding challenges.

Research spotlight talks will demonstrate research of instructors/scientists using taught techniques in the wild.

This event is organized in collaboration with the Image Analysis Focused Interest Group and is sponsored by the Royal Microscopical Society.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Image Analysis for Biologists Mon 11 Dec 2017   09:30 Finished

This course will focus on computational methods for analysing cellular images and extracting quantitative data from them. The aim of this course is to familiarise the participants with computational image analysis methodologies, and to provide hands-on training in running quantitative analysis pipelines.

On day 1 we will introduce principles of image processing and analysis, giving an overview of commonly used algorithms through a series of talks and practicals based on Fiji, an extensible open source software package.

On day 2, we will cover time series processing and cell tracking using TrackMate. The afternoon of day two will focus on understanding the basics of deconvolution and colocalisation, using tools in Fiji to look at basic examples of how to apply deconvolution and how to carry out colocalisation analysis in fluorescence microscopy.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Image Analysis for Biologists Mon 24 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

This course will focus on computational methods for analysing cellular images and extracting quantitative data from them. The aim of this course is to familiarise the participants with computational image analysis methodologies, and to provide hands-on training in running quantitative analysis pipelines.

On day 1 we will introduce principles of image processing and analysis, giving an overview of commonly used algorithms through a series of talks and practicals based on Fiji, an extensible open source software package.

On day 2, we will cover time series processing and cell tracking using TrackMate and advanced image segmentation using Ilastik. Additionally, in the afternoon we will run a study design and data clinic (sign up will be required) for participants that wish to discuss their experiments.

On day 3, we will describe the open Icy platform developed at the Institut Pasteur. Icy is a next-generation, user-friendly software offering powerful acquisition, visualisation, annotation and analysis algorithms for 5D bioimaging data, together with unique automation/scripting capabilities (notably via its graphical programming interface) and tight integration with existing software (e.g. ImageJ, Matlab, Micro-Manager).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

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