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Social Sciences Research Methods Centre course timetable

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Sat 3 Dec – Wed 8 Feb 2017

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Tuesday 17 January 2017

14:00
Introduction to R (1 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module introduces the use of R, a programming language originally developed for statistical data analysis. In this course, we will use R through R Studio, a user-friendly interface for R. Students will learn ways of reading spreadsheet data into R, the notion of data type, how to manipulate data in major data types, draw basic graphs, summarise data with descriptive statistics, and perform basic inferential statistics (e.g., t-test). This module is intended primarily for students who have no prior experience in programming. This course covers how to perform data analysis with R but does not introduce analytical techniques.

Introduction to Stata (Series 2) (1 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

The course will provide students with an introduction to the popular and powerful statistics package Stata, a program commonly used in both social and natural sciences.

Wednesday 18 January 2017

14:00
Introduction to R (2 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module introduces the use of R, a programming language originally developed for statistical data analysis. In this course, we will use R through R Studio, a user-friendly interface for R. Students will learn ways of reading spreadsheet data into R, the notion of data type, how to manipulate data in major data types, draw basic graphs, summarise data with descriptive statistics, and perform basic inferential statistics (e.g., t-test). This module is intended primarily for students who have no prior experience in programming. This course covers how to perform data analysis with R but does not introduce analytical techniques.

Introduction to Stata (Series 2) (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

The course will provide students with an introduction to the popular and powerful statistics package Stata, a program commonly used in both social and natural sciences.

Monday 23 January 2017

09:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS Intensive) (1 of 2) Not bookable 09:00 - 13:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. The day consists of a lecture, and a computer lab session with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must complete the SSRMC Skill Check before a place can be booked for them.

Students that have already completed the Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

14:00
Foundations in Applied Statistics (FiAS Intensive) (2 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This foundational course is for graduate students who have no prior training in statistics.

Topics covered include: the notion of variables and how they are measured; ways of describing the central tendency and the dispersion of a variable; and the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical significance. The course also introduces students to the software Stata. The day consists of a lecture, and a computer lab session with exercises in Stata.

Bookings

All students wishing to book a place on this module must complete the SSRMC Skill Check before a place can be booked for them.

Students that have already completed the Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

Tuesday 24 January 2017

09:00
Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA Intensive) (1 of 2) Not bookable 09:00 - 13:00 Institute of Criminology, Room B4

This module introduces students to four of the most commonly used statistical tests in the social sciences: correlation, chi-square tests, t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Building upon the univariate techniques introduced in the Foundations in Applied Statistics module, these sessions aim to provide students with a thorough understanding of statistical methods designed to test associations between two variables (bivariate statistics). Students will learn about the assumptions underlying each test, and will receive practical instruction on how to generate and interpret bivariate results using Stata.

Bookings

Before a place can be booked for them, all students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

14:00
Basic Quantitative Analysis (BQA Intensive) (2 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module introduces students to four of the most commonly used statistical tests in the social sciences: correlation, chi-square tests, t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Building upon the univariate techniques introduced in the Foundations in Applied Statistics module, these sessions aim to provide students with a thorough understanding of statistical methods designed to test associations between two variables (bivariate statistics). Students will learn about the assumptions underlying each test, and will receive practical instruction on how to generate and interpret bivariate results using Stata.

Bookings

Before a place can be booked for them, all students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

Doing Qualitative Interviews (1 of 4) [Places] 14:00 - 15:30 New Museums Site, Babbage Lecture Theatre

Face-to-face interviews are used to collect a wide range of information in the social sciences. They are appropriate for the gathering of information on individual and institutional patterns of behaviour; complex histories or processes; identities and cultural meanings; routines that are not written down; and life-history events. Face-to-face interviews thus comprise an appropriate method to generate information on individual behaviour, the reasons for certain patterns of acting and talking, and the type of connection people have with each other.

The first session provides an overview of interviewing as a social research method, then focuses on the processes of organising and conducting qualitative interviews. The second session explores the ethics and practical constraints of interviews as a research method, particularly relevant when attempting to engage with marginalised or stigmatised communities. The third session focuses on organisation and analysis after interviews, including interpretation through coding and close reading. This session involves practical examples from qualitative analysis software. The final session provides an opportunity for a hands-on session, to which students should bring their interview material (at whatever stage of the process: whether writing interview questions, coding or analysing data) in order to receive advice and support in taking the interview material/data to the next stage of the research process.

16:00
Survey Research and Design (1 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. Students who attend this course will be able to design their own evaluate research that uses surveys, in particular to understand issues concerning sample selection, response bias and data analysis; to appreciate and use basic principles of questionnaire design; and to trace appropriate sources of data and appropriate exemplars of good survey practice.

Wednesday 25 January 2017

14:00
Public Policy Analysis new (1 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

The analysis of policy depends on many disciplines and techniques and so is difficult for many researchers to access. This module provides a mixed perspective on policy analysis, taking both an academic and a practitioner perspective. This is because the same tools and techniques can be used in academic research on policy options and change as those used in practice in a policy environment. This course is provided as three 2 hour sessions delivered as a mix of lectures and seminars. No direct analysis work will be done in the sessions themselves, but sample data and questions will be provided for students who wish to take the material into practice.

Monday 30 January 2017

09:00
Doing Multivariate Analysis (DMA Intensive) (1 of 2) Not bookable 09:00 - 13:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

This module will introduce you to the theory and practice of multivariate analysis, covering Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and logistic regressions. You will learn how to read published results critically, to do simple multivariate modelling yourself, and to interpret and write about your results intelligently.

Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre, and covers the theory behind multivariate regression; the other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using statistical software.

To get the most out of the course, you should also expect to spend some time between sessions having fun by building your own statistical models.

Bookings

Before a place can be booked for them, all students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

14:00
Doing Multivariate Analysis (DMA Intensive) (2 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module will introduce you to the theory and practice of multivariate analysis, covering Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and logistic regressions. You will learn how to read published results critically, to do simple multivariate modelling yourself, and to interpret and write about your results intelligently.

Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre, and covers the theory behind multivariate regression; the other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using statistical software.

To get the most out of the course, you should also expect to spend some time between sessions having fun by building your own statistical models.

Bookings

Before a place can be booked for them, all students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.

Students for whom this module is not compulsory can make a booking via the Basic Statistics Stream Booking Form on the SSRMC website.

In cases where you have a problem or a clash, please contact the SSRMC Administrator who will try to help you.

Tuesday 31 January 2017

14:00
Doing Qualitative Interviews (2 of 4) [Places] 14:00 - 15:30 New Museums Site, Babbage Lecture Theatre

Face-to-face interviews are used to collect a wide range of information in the social sciences. They are appropriate for the gathering of information on individual and institutional patterns of behaviour; complex histories or processes; identities and cultural meanings; routines that are not written down; and life-history events. Face-to-face interviews thus comprise an appropriate method to generate information on individual behaviour, the reasons for certain patterns of acting and talking, and the type of connection people have with each other.

The first session provides an overview of interviewing as a social research method, then focuses on the processes of organising and conducting qualitative interviews. The second session explores the ethics and practical constraints of interviews as a research method, particularly relevant when attempting to engage with marginalised or stigmatised communities. The third session focuses on organisation and analysis after interviews, including interpretation through coding and close reading. This session involves practical examples from qualitative analysis software. The final session provides an opportunity for a hands-on session, to which students should bring their interview material (at whatever stage of the process: whether writing interview questions, coding or analysing data) in order to receive advice and support in taking the interview material/data to the next stage of the research process.

14:15
Research Ethics (Series 2) [Places] 14:15 - 17:15 Institute of Criminology, Room B3

Ethics is becoming an increasingly important issue for all researchers and the aim of these three sessions is to demonstrate the practical value of thinking seriously and systematically about what constitutes ethical conduct in social science research. The sessions will involve some small-group work.

16:00
Survey Research and Design (2 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. Students who attend this course will be able to design their own evaluate research that uses surveys, in particular to understand issues concerning sample selection, response bias and data analysis; to appreciate and use basic principles of questionnaire design; and to trace appropriate sources of data and appropriate exemplars of good survey practice.

Wednesday 1 February 2017

14:00
Public Policy Analysis new (2 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

The analysis of policy depends on many disciplines and techniques and so is difficult for many researchers to access. This module provides a mixed perspective on policy analysis, taking both an academic and a practitioner perspective. This is because the same tools and techniques can be used in academic research on policy options and change as those used in practice in a policy environment. This course is provided as three 2 hour sessions delivered as a mix of lectures and seminars. No direct analysis work will be done in the sessions themselves, but sample data and questions will be provided for students who wish to take the material into practice.

16:00
Conversation and Discourse Analysis (1 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

The module will introduce students to the study of language use as a distinctive type of social practice. Attention will be focused primarily on the methodological and analytic principles of conversation analysis. (CA). However, it will explore the debates between CA and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), as a means of addressing the relationship between the study of language use and the study of other aspects of social life. It will also consider the roots of conversation analysis in the research initiatives of ethnomethodology, and the analysis of ordinary and institutional talk. It will finally consider the interface between CA and CDA.

Monday 6 February 2017

10:00
Further Topics in Multivariate Analysis (FTMA) (1 of 4) Not bookable 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This module is an extension of the three previous modules in the Basic Statistics stream, covering the theory and practice of multivariate analysis. Students will gain deeper knowledge of interaction effects in regression models and its interpretation as well as introduction to ordered and categorical regression models. You will learn why and when to use interaction between explanatory variables, to do simple marginal effects of interaction variables, to understand the principles for employing multinomial and ordered categorical models, to perform simple models or these kind, and to interpret and write about your results intelligently. Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre, and covers the theory behind interaction effects, multinomial and ordered categorical models. The other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using Stata statistical software.

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR

before a place can be booked for them.


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module can also be made via:

13:30
Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis (1 of 2) [Places] 13:30 - 15:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

The focus of these two sessions will be the linking of theory to method, paying particular attention to the relationship between language or other forms of representation or communication and the broader social milieu with special attention to power relations. The topic will be approached from a broadly Foucauldian angle: Foucault writes that discourse “consists of not—of no longer—treating discourses as groups of signs signifying elements referring to contents of representations, but as practices that systematically form the objects of which they speak.” The emphasis of these two lectures will be less upon what is known as ‘conversation analysis’ or ‘content analysis’ and more on methods based on post-positivist methods and critical theory which emphasize how language and other social practices create reality rather than reflect it, and thus methods of interpreting discourse are themselves not ideologically or politically neutral practices.

14:00
Further Topics in Multivariate Analysis (FTMA) (2 of 4) Not bookable 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This module is an extension of the three previous modules in the Basic Statistics stream, covering the theory and practice of multivariate analysis. Students will gain deeper knowledge of interaction effects in regression models and its interpretation as well as introduction to ordered and categorical regression models. You will learn why and when to use interaction between explanatory variables, to do simple marginal effects of interaction variables, to understand the principles for employing multinomial and ordered categorical models, to perform simple models or these kind, and to interpret and write about your results intelligently. Half of the module is based in the lecture theatre, and covers the theory behind interaction effects, multinomial and ordered categorical models. The other half is lab-based, in which students will work through practical exercises using Stata statistical software.

All students wishing to book a place on this module must have either:

OR

before a place can be booked for them.


Students that have already completed the SSRMC Skill Check may have had a place booked for them by their Department. Students can check this by typing their CRSid into the search box at the very top right of this page, hitting the enter key then clicking on their name. This will show all module(s) that they are booked onto, as applicable.


Bookings for this module can also be made via:

16:00
Meta Analysis (1 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Students are introduced to meta-analysis, a powerful statistical technique allowing researchers to synthesize available evidence for a given research question using standardized (comparable) effect sizes across studies. The sessions teach students how to compute treatment effects, how to compute effect sizes based on correlational studies, how to address questions such as what is the association of bullying victimization with depression? The module will be useful for students who seek to draw statistical conclusions in a standardized manner from literature reviews they are conducting.

Tuesday 7 February 2017

14:00
Doing Qualitative Interviews (3 of 4) [Places] 14:00 - 15:30 New Museums Site, Babbage Lecture Theatre

Face-to-face interviews are used to collect a wide range of information in the social sciences. They are appropriate for the gathering of information on individual and institutional patterns of behaviour; complex histories or processes; identities and cultural meanings; routines that are not written down; and life-history events. Face-to-face interviews thus comprise an appropriate method to generate information on individual behaviour, the reasons for certain patterns of acting and talking, and the type of connection people have with each other.

The first session provides an overview of interviewing as a social research method, then focuses on the processes of organising and conducting qualitative interviews. The second session explores the ethics and practical constraints of interviews as a research method, particularly relevant when attempting to engage with marginalised or stigmatised communities. The third session focuses on organisation and analysis after interviews, including interpretation through coding and close reading. This session involves practical examples from qualitative analysis software. The final session provides an opportunity for a hands-on session, to which students should bring their interview material (at whatever stage of the process: whether writing interview questions, coding or analysing data) in order to receive advice and support in taking the interview material/data to the next stage of the research process.

16:00
Survey Research and Design (3 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

The module aims to provide students with an introduction to and overview of survey methods and its uses and limitations. It will introduce students both to some of the main theoretical issues involved in survey research (such as survey sampling, non-response and question wording) and to practicalities of the design and analysis of surveys. Students who attend this course will be able to design their own evaluate research that uses surveys, in particular to understand issues concerning sample selection, response bias and data analysis; to appreciate and use basic principles of questionnaire design; and to trace appropriate sources of data and appropriate exemplars of good survey practice.

Wednesday 8 February 2017

14:00
Public Policy Analysis new (3 of 3) [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

The analysis of policy depends on many disciplines and techniques and so is difficult for many researchers to access. This module provides a mixed perspective on policy analysis, taking both an academic and a practitioner perspective. This is because the same tools and techniques can be used in academic research on policy options and change as those used in practice in a policy environment. This course is provided as three 2 hour sessions delivered as a mix of lectures and seminars. No direct analysis work will be done in the sessions themselves, but sample data and questions will be provided for students who wish to take the material into practice.

16:00
Conversation and Discourse Analysis (2 of 4) [Places] 16:00 - 17:30 New Museums Site, Hopkinson Lecture Theatre

The module will introduce students to the study of language use as a distinctive type of social practice. Attention will be focused primarily on the methodological and analytic principles of conversation analysis. (CA). However, it will explore the debates between CA and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), as a means of addressing the relationship between the study of language use and the study of other aspects of social life. It will also consider the roots of conversation analysis in the research initiatives of ethnomethodology, and the analysis of ordinary and institutional talk. It will finally consider the interface between CA and CDA.